American Literature EE 51
Sections One and Two
Spragins
Fall 2019

In 1931, a popular historian named James Truslow Adams published a one-volume history of the United States called The Epic of America. In the epilogue he coined the term “the American dream,” which he defined as "a dream of a social order in which each man and each woman shall be able to attain to the fullest stature of which they are innately capable, and be recognized by others for what they are, regardless of the fortuitous circumstances of birth or position." This dream, he wrote, “has been realized more fully in actual life here than anywhere else, though very imperfectly even among ourselves.”  -- Nicholas Lemann




1st Period and Second Period: ODD Days
 


Room GC 201
Office Hours 2:15-3:30 p.m. (daily)
jspragins@gilman.edu
  



Day 0 Orientation
 
The arriual of the Englishmen in Virginia
Debry Woodcut (1590) (Description)
The New World

 
The Tempest (1611) by William Shakespeare


 

The Autobiography of Benjamin Franklin (1771-90)


Narrative of the Life of Frederick Douglass, an American Slave (1845)


 

The American Renaissance:
Emerson, Thoreau, Hawthorne, Poe, Whitman, and Dickinson

 




The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn (1876-83) by MarkTwain


Month

Day

  Cycle Day

 Day

Assignment

 

08/      

28

Day 0

Wed.

 Mini-Schedule



 


Course Description
Course Texts

Gilman School Computer Network Resources:

Homework:






08/

29

Day 1

Thurs.





Grammar Pre-Test

Gilman School Computer Network Resources:

Summer Reading Discussion 


Discussion: Essay Process

Homework:

08/ 30 Day 2 Fri.





09/

02

Day 0 

Mon.

 LABOR DAY






09/

03

Day 3

Tues.










Spain's New World Empire, 1600

Portrait of Self as a Writer (Semester Goals) due Wed. 9/4 by 3:30 pm

Complete Grammar Pre-test
Vocabulary Unit One

Discussion: Essay Process

First Encounters in the New World (Powerpoint) 

PARAGRAPH: Columbus' first reaction to his encounter with the natives of Hispaniola.

The English sought to do something entirely different. The Spanish were their enemies. They dreamed of setting those enslaved by the Spanish free and living with them.

from Terence Malik's The New World (2005)

Essay on The Tempest  due Thursday, October 10th at 3:30 pm

Homework:

09/ 04 Day 4 Wed.

09/ 05 Day 5
Thurs. GILMAN PARENTS NIGHT



The arrival of the Englishmen in Virginia


A Cimmaron


Sir Francis Drake (1540-1596)


 "Remuneration!"

Discussion of "Dreams of Liberation" chapter one of American Slavery...American Freedom (1975) by Edmund Morgan; Study Guide 

Quiz on Morgan (closed book on paper)

Paragraph: "What if....."

Homework:


09/

06

Day 6

Fri.


09/

09

Day 7

Mon.





Watercolor drawing "Indians Fishing"
by John White (created 1585-1586).


Discussion: “The Lost Colony"Study Guide; (Quiz)

Paragraph: What doomed the Roanoke Colony and with it a vision of English liberty which included both Blacks and Native Americans?

Homework:

For Further Reading:

09/ 10 Day 8 Tues.
09/

11

Day 9

Wed.





John White's Map of the Outer Banks
of North Carolina (1584)
excerpts from Montaigne: "On Cannibals"  (first published in England in 1603, translated by John Florio) (Study Guide) (answers) (Video)
  • How does Montaigne define "barbarism" and "wild"? Which, then, is the superior shaping force: nature or nurture?
  • In Montaigne's opinion, how did the societies of the New World surpass the Golden Age
  • Why do these natives engage in cannibalism? (Why does Montaigne consider this behavior more civilized than European warfare?)

Paragraph: What is Montaigne right about? Or is he too being sucked into the utopian vision of America?

Homework:

Roanoke Reports: 
In 1585 John White sailed to America with the Roanoke colonists and then lived for thirteen months with the Arawak tribe in the area where the English tried to launch their multi-racial colony. Choose one of the paintings and write a brief report about your impressions of his or her life.

DIRECTIONS:

Go ahead and be creative. But do the following first:
  • Carefully observe a White watercolor;
  • Compare the picture with its  narrative description (written by Thomas Hariot, who also lived in the Roanoke colony). 
  • Take a look as well at the DeBrys woodcut made to help promote colonization in Virginia. (DeBrys had never been to the New World.)
  • Read the detailed annotations linked to the picture. 
  • Write a creative report about your impressions of this person's life. (Use the 1st person if you like.)
  • What purpose do these texts and images serve?
  • What preconceptions did the English bring to bear on their understanding of the natives?
  • What are the Indians really up to?

Due Tuesday, September 17th by 3:30 p.m

For further reading:

09/ 12 Day 10 Thurs.
09/

13

Day 1

Fri.

BMS and RPCS Retreat

Roanoke Reports: 
In 1585 John White sailed to America with the Roanoke colonists and then lived for thirteen months with the Arawak tribe in the area where the English tried to launch their multi-racial colony. Choose one of the paintings and write a brief report about your impressions of his or her life. 

DIRECTIONS:

Go ahead and be creative. But do the following first:
  • Carefully observe a White watercolor;
  • Compare the picture with its  narrative description (written by Thomas Hariot, who also lived in the Roanoke colony). 
  • Take a look as well at the DeBrys woodcut made to help promote colonization in Virginia. (DeBrys had never been to the New World.)
  • Read the detailed annotations linked to the picture. 
  • Write a creative report about your impressions of this person's life. (Use the 1st person if you like.)
  • What purpose do these texts and images serve?
  • Compare details of the painting with the woodcut.
  • What preconceptions did the English bring to bear on their understanding of the natives?
  • What are the Indians really up to?

Due Tuesday, September 17th by 3:30 p.m
09/ 16 Day 2 Mon.
09/

17

Day 3

Tues.

 


Shakespeare. The Chandos Portrait

Roanoke Reports due by 3:30 p.m.: 

The True Pictures and Fashions of the People in That Parte of America Now Called Virginia (1585) (from Virtual Jamestown)

  • What purpose do these texts and images serve?
  • What preconceptions did the English bring to bear on their understanding of the natives?
  • Compare details of the painting with the woodcut.
  • What are the Indians really up to?
  • Summary of Roanoke Experiment

 Why We Study Shakespeare:
Homework:

For further reading:

09/

18

Day 4

Wed.

 

09/ 19 Day 5 Thurs.



In 1609, the ship Sea Venture wrecked near the Bermudas on its way to Jamestown. Hear more about its possible link to The Tempest in this excerpt from the Shakespeare in American Life radio documentary.



Background Notes to Shakespeare's The Tempest (1611)

Essay on The Tempest  due Thursday, October 10th at 3:30 pm

The Tempest (Act I, scene ii) "Prospero’s Cell", Prospero, Miranda, Ariel, Sycorax, Caliban, Ferdinand; (Quiz); Study Guide  

Discussion: 

Homework:

Character Report: (Google Slides Presentations) on Prospero, Miranda, Ariel, or Caliban:

To understand Shakespeare's purpose in The Tempest, it is essential that we use our critical imagination to discover the back story involving each of key characters. 

  • Imagine a brief biography for your character.
  • Find imagery on the internet to illustrate your story.
  • Support your conclusions with evidence from the text.
  • Be prepared to present next class.

Prospero:

  • How did he lose his dukedom?
  • What kind of magic has he mastered? (Are there any limits to his power?)
  • What kind of society did he try to create during the fifteen years he has lived on the island?
  • When and why did things go so terribly wrong on the island?

Miranda:
  • Has she ever seen her father so angry before?
  • What does she know about who she is?
  • Who was her mother?
  • What has her life been like on the island for fifteen years?
  • What has her relationship with Caliban been like until very recently?

Ariel:
  • Who or what is Ariel?
  • What was his role when he served Sycorax, Caliban's mother?
  • How long was he imrisoned in a tree?
  • What kind of magic powers does he possess?
  • What is his relationship like with Prospero?

Caliban:
  • What was his life like before Prospero came to the island?
  • How old was he when his mother died?
  • For fifteen years, what was his relationship like with Prospero and Miranda?
  • What went wrong? (Do you blame him?) 

Study the following speeches by (ar about) your character from  Iii :



Full Fathom Five (detail)
by Jackson Pollack (1947)


Full Fathom Five by Jackson Pollack (1947)
09/

20

Day 6

Fri.


09/

23

Day 7

Mon.








Background Notes to Shakespeare's The Tempest (1611)

Essay on The Tempest  due Thursday, October 10th at 3:30 pm

Character Reports on Prospero, Miranda, Ariel, Sycorax, Caliban, and Ferdinand (due by 3:30 p.m.)

  • Imagine a brief biography for your character.
  • Find imagery on the internet to illustrate your story.
  • Support your conclusions with evidence from the text.
  • Be prepared to present next class

Discussion: Prospero's Rage (and its cure?)

Paragraphs:
  • Describe Prospero's state of mind at the outset of the action. From what past experiences in Prospero's life has the tempest sprung?
  • How does the imagery of Ariel's Song relate to Prospero's revenge?

Homework:


09/

24

Day 8

Tues.


09/ 25 Day 9 Wed.



Poole, Paul Falconer. Scene

from "The Tempest" (1856)




Stephano and the Beast


Trinculo Vented

Essay on The Tempest  due Thursday, October 10th at 3:30 pm

Paragraphs:
  • How might the original English model of colonization, if it had been successfully implemented, have changed American history? How did this Utopian model go awry?
  • Describe Prospero's state of mind at the outset of the action. From what past experiences in Prospero's life has the tempest sprung?
  • How does the imagery of Ariel's Song relate to Prospero's revenge?
  • How do people like Antonio make utopia impossible?
  • In the very next scene, Caliban believes he has been given a magical opportunity to take revenge on Prospero. What is Shakespeare's take on Caliban's desire for vengeance?

The Tempest (Act I, scene ii) "Prospero’s Cell", Prospero, Miranda, Ariel, Sycorax, Caliban, Ferdinand

The Tempest,  Act II, scene i "What's Past is Prologue"; (Quiz) Study Guide


Paragraph: How do people like Antonio make utopia impossible?

Act II, scene ii: "O brave monster!(Effects) (Taymor)

Caliban:

Paragraph:  How does this comic scene make Shakespeare's point about the desire for vengeance?

Homework:

09/

26

Day 10

Thurs.


09/

27

Day 1

Fri.





Ferdinand and Miranda


Stephano, Trinculo and Caliban Beset by Spirits


Essay on The Tempest  due Thursday, October 10th at 3:30 pm

Paragraphs:

  • How might the original English model of colonization, if it had been successfully implemented, have changed American history? How did this Utopian model go awry?
  • Describe Prospero's state of mind at the outset of the action. From what past experiences in Prospero's life has the tempest sprung?
  • How does the imagery of Ariel's Song relate to Prospero's revenge?
  • How do people like Antonio make utopia impossible?

Act II, scene ii: "O brave monster!(Effects)
  • In the very next scene, Caliban believes he has been given a magical opportunity to take revenge on Prospero. What is Shakespeare's take on Caliban's desire for vengeance? (Compare to Antonio: (The Primal Sin: (I ii))

Act III Scene i: Admired Miranda!
  • What is significant about the fact that Miranda proposes to Ferdinand?
  • Anything worry you about the perfection of Miranda and Ferdinand's budding relationship?
  • How does Prospero's response to Miranda's engagement fit into Shakespeare's overall purpose in the play?

Act III, scene ii: When Prospero is destroyed  (Study Guide) (Quiz
  • Is there any difference between Antonio's plot and Caliban's? What is the way of the world according to Machiavelli?
  • Consider Caliban's great speech, "The isle is full of noises",  describing the wonders of Prospero's island. Would he have been better off never having met the Europeans and learning how to speak their language? 

Reviewing Caliban:

Paragraph: What is Shakespeare's vision of Caliban's character? Is he a victim or a villain?

Homework:

09/

30

Day 0

Mon.

ROSH HASHANAH
10/ 01

Day 2

Tues.

 

10/

02

Day 3

Wed.






Ariel as Harpy


Costume design for A Star from

"Oberon the Faery Prince" (1611)


Essay on The Tempest  due Thursday, October 10th at 3:30 pm

Paragraphs:

  • How might the original English model of colonization, if it had been successfully implemented, have changed American history? How did this Utopian model go awry?
  • Describe Prospero's state of mind at the outset of the action. From what past experiences in Prospero's life has the tempest sprung?
  • How does the imagery of Ariel's Song relate to Prospero's revenge?
  • How do people like Antonio make utopia impossible?
  • In the very next scene, Caliban believes he has been given a magical opportunity to take revenge on Prospero. What is Shakespeare's take on Caliban's desire for vengeance?
  • How does Prospero's response to Miranda's engagement fit into Shakespeare's overall purpose in the play?

Quiz on Reading Assignment

Paragraph: Can you propose a solution to Prospero's dilemma?

  1. Antonio (Machiavelli's bleak vision of human nature) Can you devise a government which will contain the ruthless ambition of immoral people? (Must Prospero turn himself into Machiavelli's Prince?)
  2. Caliban (Colonialism) Must the interaction between modern and undeveloped cultures be one way? (Should Caliban have been taught how to speak English?)
  3. Miranda (Patriarchy) How can a parent protect a child from the dangers of the real world? (Should Prospero intervene in the budding relationship between Miranda and Ferdinand-- as he did earlier between Miranda and Caliban? If so, how?)
  4. Ariel (Power) (Is there really any magic which exists to help Prospero with these dilemmas?)

Act III, scene iii: The Deep and Dreadful Name of Prosper  (Effects

  • Have you ever had a dream which flipped suddenly from wish fulfillment to nightmare? When does this scene change? Why does Shakespeare construct this climactic scene in this way? 
  • What does Ariel actually do to Alonso, Antonio and Sebastian? Can you imagine a worse punishment? What kind of vengeance has Prospero chosen to take? (Could such a punishment be meted out to a prisoner today?)

Act IV, scene i: The Masque: A Most Majestic Vision  Study Guide  

  • How has Ferdinand passed Prospero's test?
  • Use your imagination and conjure up a suitable spectacle to celebrate such a moment. What spirits would you summon to the scene? (Masque Powerpoint)
  • What causes the celebration to suddenly evaporate? 
  • Even though Prospero and Ariel can easily deal with the plot, what un-resolvable philosophical problem does the rebellion present?
  • How do you interepret Prospero's Great Speech: "Our revels now are ended..."
  • Do you agree with Prospero's final condemnation of Caliban?
  • How does he punish him?

Homework: 






10/

03

Day 4

Thurs.







10/

04

Day 5

Fri.





Slavery in Jamestown (1619)


Miranda and Prospero on the Beach


Essay on The Tempest  due Thursday, October 10th at 3:30 pm

Act V, scene i: O brave new world!; Epilogue  Study Guide  (Quiz) (Tempest Spot Passages)

Homework:


10/ 07 Day 6 Mon.

10/

08

Day 7

Tues.





The Daughter of Niger from The Masque of Blackness
(1606) by Ben Johnson and Inigo Jones


Essay on The Tempest  due Thursday, October 10th at 3:30 pm

Essay Workshop: 


Tempest Review:
  • How might the original English model of colonization, if it had been successfully implemented, have changed American history? How did this Utopian model go wrong?
  • Describe Prospero's state of mind at the outset of the action. From what past experiences in Prospero's life has the tempest sprung?
  • Can you propose a solution to Prospero's dilemma? How does the imagery of Ariel's Song relate to Prospero's revenge?
  • Antonio (Machiavelli's bleak vision of human nature) Can you devise a government which will contain the ruthless ambition of immoral people? (Must Prospero turn himself into Machiavelli's Prince?)
  • Caliban (Colonialism) Must the interaction between modern and undeveloped cultures be one way? (Should Caliban have been taught how to speak?)
  • Miranda (Patriarchy) How can a parent protect a child from the dangers of the real world? (Should Prospero intervene in the budding relationship between Miranda and Ferdinand-- as he did earlier between Miranda and Caliban? If so, how?)
  • Ariel (Power) (Is there really any magic which exists to help Prospero with these dilemmas?)

Homework: 






10/ 09 Day 0 Wed YOM KIPPUR
10/

10

Day 8           

Thurs.


10/

11

Day 9 

Fri.



Benjamin Franklin (1706- 1790)


Franklin, Jefferson and Adams work on the draft of the Declaration of Independence

Essay on The Tempest  due Thursday, October 10th at 3:30 pm

Essay on Franklin due Friday, November 1st at 3:30 p.m.

The Autobiography of Benjamin Franklin (1770-90)  (introduction)

The Enlightenment:

Deism: The Enlightenment Dream: from Carl Becker, The Heavenly City of the Eighteenth Century Philosophers (1932)

  • Man is not born in a sinful, depraved state. 
  • The end of life is life itself: the good life on earth, not life after death in heaven.
  • Man is capable, guided solely by the light of reason and experience, of perfecting life on earth.
  • To accomplish this great goal, we must free our minds from the bonds of ignorance and superstition and our bodies from the oppression of corrupt social authorities. 

For further study:

10/

14

Day 10 

Mon.


10/

15

Day 1

Tues.




Ben Franklin in 1723

The Autobiography of Benjamin Franklin (1770-90)  (introduction) (Franklin Biography) (Wikipedia)

All ideas come from sensation or reflection. Let us then suppose the mind to be, as we say, white paper, void of all characters, without any ideas:- How comes it to be furnished? Whence comes it by that vast store which the busy and boundless fancy of man has painted on it with an almost endless variety? Whence has it all the materials of reason and knowledge?  To this I answer, in one word, from EXPERIENCE. John Locke,  An Essay Concerning Human Understanding (1690)

Backgrounds: The Enlightenment


18th c. American Art (Powerpoint)

Creative Writing Assignment:

Choose one of the art works and make up a story about the artist or  the characters in it. (Read the background materials to find ideas.)

Homework:

For Further Reading:

10/

16

Day 2

Wed.

PSAT's





10/ 17
Day 3 Thurs.





The Printing Press from Diderot's Encyclopedie



Essay on Franklin due Friday, November 1st at 3:30 p.m.

Autobiography, part one (1771)  "Childhood and Apprenticeship" (Notes) (pp.45-75) Study Guide One; Vocabulary List One; Quiz 1; Lecture Notes One

Franklin Essay Questions


Epigram- a pithy saying or remark expressing an idea in a clever and amusing way.


Franklin Epigrams from "Poor Richard's Almanack"


Extra Credit Writing Exercise: 

Write a letter to the editor of your school newspaper on a controversial topic, but instead of revealing yourself as the author, adopt the persona of someone who completely disagrees with your position. 
  • Use modest rhetoric.
  • Use some words from today's vocab list.
  • Use an anecdote to spice your argument.
  • Summarize your message with a moral epigram.
  • Argue this person's case in such a ridiculous manner that you wind up defending your own opinion. 
  • Franklin's Model Writing Style

Homework: 

10/

18

Day 4

Fri.







10/

21

Day 5

Mon.



Susan Dunn,  The Other Franklin:  Book of Ages: The Life and Opinions of Jane Franklin by Jill Lepore NYRB Oct 2013


Colonial America  1754


William Penn's plan for the City of Philadelphia (1683)

Port of Philadelphia 1752

Essay on Franklin due Friday, November 1st at 3:30 p.m.

Autobiography, part one Philadelphia and London (pp.76-106) (Notes) Study Guide Two; Vocab List Two; Quiz 2; Lecture Notes Two

Franklin Essay Questions


Franklin's Model Writing Style

  • Franklin Epigrams from "Poor Richard's Almanack" (Epigram- a pithy saying or remark expressing an idea in a clever and amusing way.)


Writing Exercise: 

Write a letter to the editor of your school newspaper on a controversial topic, but instead of revealing yourself as the author, adopt the persona of someone who completely disagrees with your position. 

  • Use modest rhetoric.
  • Use some words from today's vocab list.
  • Use an anecdote to spice your argument.
  • Summarize your message with a moral epigram.
  • Argue this person's case in such a ridiculous manner that you wind up defending your own opinion. 
  • Franklin's Model Writing Style

Homework: 

10/ 22 Day 6 Tues.





10/
23
Day 7
Wed.




 from Hogarth's A Harlot's Progress (1731)

(Hogarth at Smarthistory)


"The Rake at the Rose Tavern"
from The Rake's Progress,
William Hogarth 1735


Essay on Franklin due Friday, November 1st at 3:30 p.m.

Key Precepts of Good Writing

Autobiography, part one Philadelphia and London (pp.76-106) (Notes) Study Guide Two; Vocab List Two; Quiz 3; Lecture Notes Two

Franklin Essay Questions 

  • Introduction: Tabula Rasa, Modesty and the American Dream
  • Parents and Education
    • Anecdotes and Dinner Conversations
    • The Art of the Deal
    • Teaching Himself Reading, Writing, and Public Speaking
  • Errata
    • Breaking Apprenticeship with Brother
    • Handling Money and Debt
    • Judgment of Character
    • Treatment of Women
  • Reaching Maturity in London
  • The Pennsylvania Gazette

Franklin in London:

Hogarth Powerpoint: The Rake's Progress (1735)

PARAGRAPH: 
  • Even though Franklin did not make much money in London, what great lessons did he learn there? What plan did he draw up on his voyage home?

Homework:

10/

24

Day 8

Thurs.


10/ 25 Day 9 Fri.



The Pennsylvania Gazette January 2, 1750


Philadelphia 18th c.Townhouses


Philadelphia Statehouse



Essay on Franklin due Friday, November 1st at 3:30 p.m.

Read Autobiography, part one The Pennsylvania Gazette (pp. 106-131); Study Guide Three; Quiz 4; Vocab List Three; Lecture Notes Three

Franklin Essay Questions

  • Introduction: Tabula Rasa, Modesty and the American Dream
  • Parents and Education
    • Anecdotes and Dinner Conversations
    • The Art of the Deal
    • Teaching Himself Reading, Writing, and Public Speaking
  • Errata
    • Breaking Apprenticeship with Brother
    • Handling Money and Debt
    • Judgment of Character
    • Treatment of Women
  • Reaching Maturity in London
  • The Pennsylvania Gazette

    Extra Credit Writing Exercises:

    Homework:


    10/

    28

    Day 10

    Mon.


    10/

    29

    Day 1

    Tues.

     


    Nicholas Boylston (1767) John Singleton Copley


    Philadelphia Independence Hall





    Frederick Douglass Collaborative Projects

    Essay on Franklin due Friday, November 1st at 3:30 pm

    Autobiography, part one The Pennsylvania Gazette (pp. 106-131)  (NotesStudy Guide Three; Vocab List Three; Quiz 4; Lecture Notes Three

    Franklin Essay Questions

    • Introduction: Tabula Rasa, Modesty and the American Dream
    • Parents and Education
      • Anecdotes and Dinner Conversations
      • The Art of the Deal
      • Teaching Himself Reading, Writing, and Public Speaking
    • Errata
      • Breaking Apprenticeship with Brother
      • Handling Money and Debt
      • Judgment of Character
      • Treatment of Women
    • Reaching Maturity in London
    • The Pennsylvania Gazette

      Review:

      Dissenting Interpretations of Franklin's Autobiography:

      Homework:

      For further reading:

      10/

      30

      Day 2

      Wed.







      10/ 31
      Day 3
      Thurs.   1/2 DAY



      Benjamin Franklin


      D.H. Lawrence (1885-1930)


      John Rawls (1921-2002)


      Essay on Franklin due Friday, November 1st at 3:30 p.m.

      Autobiography, part two The Science of Virtue (pp.141-160) (1784) (Notes) Study Guide Four (Chart One, Chart Two); (Quiz 4);  Lecture Notes Four

      A Rebuttal to Franklin's Utilitarianism: 

      Franklin Essay Questions

      • Introduction: Tabula Rasa, Modesty and the American Dream
      • Parents and Education
        • Anecdotes and Dinner Conversations
        • The Art of the Deal
        • Teaching Himself Reading, Writing, and Public Speaking
      • Errata
        • Breaking Apprenticeship with Brother
        • Handling Money and Debt
        • Judgment of Character
        • Treatment of Women
      • Reaching Maturity in London
      • The Pennsylvania Gazette
        • Conclusion

        Review:

        Homework:

         

        11/ 01 Day 4 Fri.





        11/ 04
        Day 5
        Mon.

        Frederick Douglass  (1818-1895)
        Brief Biography of Frederick Douglass
        Frederick Douglass Collaborative Projects

        Choose Project Topics:

        Homework:

        Narrative of the Life of Frederick Douglass, an American Slave
        (1845)

        11/

        05

        Day 6

        Tues.


        11/
        06
        Day 7
        Wed.


        Douglass in 1845


        John Rose The Old Plantation (1785-90)
        Frederick Douglass Collaborative Projects

        Choose Project Topics:

        Narrative of the Life of Frederick Douglass, an American Slave (1845)

        Homework:

        Narrative of the Life of Frederick Douglass, an American Slave (1845)




        11/

        07

        Day 8

        Thurs.


        11/ 08 Day 9 Fri.



        Douglass in 1853

        Frederick Douglass Collaborative Projects

        Narrative of the Life of Frederick Douglass, an American Slave (1845)

        Homework:
        11/ 11 Day 0 Mon. PROFESSIONAL DAY
        11/ 12 Day 10 Tues




        11/

        13

        Day 1

        Wed.





        Douglass in 1860

        Narrative of the Life of Frederick Douglass, an American Slave (1845)

        Homework:

        Frederick Douglass Collaborative Projects

        Due Thursday, November 21st at 3:30 p.m

        11/
        14
        Day 2
        Thurs.

        11/ 15 Day 3 Fri.



        Douglass in 1875

        Narrative of the Life of Frederick Douglass, an American Slave (1845)

        Homework:

        Frederick Douglass Collaborative Projects

        Due Thursday, November 21st at 3:30 p.m

        11/ 18 Day 4
        Mon.





        11/

        19

        Day 5

        Tues.

         




        Douglass in 1890

        Narrative of the Life of Frederick Douglass, an American Slave (1845)
        • Formative Assessment

        Homework:

        Frederick Douglass Collaborative Projects

        Due Thursday, November 21st at 3:30 p.m

        11/

        20

        Day 6

        Wed.







        11/

        21

        Day 7

        Thurs.






        Ralph Waldo Emerson (1803-1882)


        Durand, Kindred Spirits (1849)

         

        Douglass Collaborative Projects Due at 3:30 p.m

        Transcendentalism: from Emerson: On Intuition in "Self-Reliance" (1841) (notes

        Thomas Cole, The Ox-Bow (1836); The Hunter's Return (1841) (Smarthistory) (American Romanticism)

        American Romantic Poetry:

         
        Journal Entry #1 (Natalie Goldberg's Rules) (prompt) (prompt2) (Goldberg 10-11)

        Homework:

        For further reading:
         
        11/
        22
        Day 8
        Fri.

        11/

        25

        Day 9

        Mon.

         




        Walden Pond from Pine Hill


        Henry David Thoreau (1817-1862)


        Thoreau, "Where I Lived and What I Lived For" from Walden or Life in the Woods (1854) (quiz)

        Discussion: Thoreau's Purpose and Method 

        Journal Entry #2: (Natalie Goldberg's Rules) (prompt 1) (Goldberg 145) (prompt 2) (Goldberg 166)

        Homework:


        For further reading:


        11/
        26
        Day 10
        Tues.

        11/ 27 Day 0 Wed. THANKSGIVING BREAK
        12/

        02

        Day 1

        Mon.






        Truman Capote (1924-84) reading
        "A Christmas Memory"

        Douglass Projects Gallery

        Creative Writing Project Due Friday, December 13th at 3:30 p.m.

        "A Christmas Memory" (1956) by Truman Capote (1924-84)


        Homework:

        12/

        03

        Day 2

        Tues.

         






        12/
        04
        Day 3
        Wed.


        Emily Dickinson (1830-1886)

        Emily Dickinson Archive
        Emily Dickinson Electronic Archives
        Douglass Projects Gallery

        Creative Writing Project Due Friday, December 13th at 3:30 p.m.

        Emily Dickinson (1830-1886):

        Dickinson's Influence:

        Homework:

        For further reading;






        12/

        05

        Day 4

        Thurs.

         

        Journal Entry #4: (prompt 1) (prompt 2) (Goldberg 134)
        12/ 06 Day 5 Fri.




        Walt Whitman (1819-1892)

        Walt Whitman Archive


        Douglass Projects Gallery

        Creative Writing Project Due Friday, December 13th at 3:30 p.m.

        Conventional 19th Century Poetry:

        Walt Whitman,  from "Song of Myself" (1855)  (In depth biography)

        Discussion:

        • Call out images that you remember from the poem.
        • Describe the perspective from which the poem is written (space and time).
        • To whom is the poem addressed?
        • Take a shot at explaining Whitman's purpose.

        Whitman's Influence:

        Homework:

        • Creative Writing: Whitman-esque Song of Myself (poem1) (poem2)

        12/

        09

        Day 6

        Mon.

         

        12/ 10 Day 7 Tues.

         

         


        Durand, Kindred Spirits (1849)

         


        Creative Writing Project Due Friday, December 13th at 3:30 p.m.

        Creative Writing Project: Evaluation

        Creative Writing Option One: Thoreau Journal 
        Creative Writing Option Two: Hawthorne Stylistic Imitation  
        Creative Writing Option Three: Capote and Family Memory 
        Creative Writing Option Four: Poe Creative Writing
        Creative Writing Option Five: Whitman-esque Song of Myself (poem1) (poem2)
        Creative Writing Option Six: Dickinson Poetry Imitation

        Creative Writing Workshop One
        Creative Writing Workshop Two






        12/

        11

        Day 8

        Wed.


        12/

        12

        Day 9 

        Thurs.



        Huckleberry Finn


        Jim (E.W. Kemble's 1885 illustration)
        Creative Writing Project Due Friday, December 13th at 3:30 p.m.

        Samuel Langhorne Clemens (1835-1910) (Chronology)

        Does Twain get it right?

        Homework:

        for further reading:  


        Jim (Barry Moser's 1985 illustration)





        12/ 13 Day 10 Fri.

         

         

         

         

         

        12/ 16 Day 1 Mon. READING DAY
        12/ 17 Day 2 Tues. EXAMS





        12/

        18

        Day 3

        Wed.

        EXAMS




        Hannibal, Missouri (1841)


        Samuel Langhorne Clemens (1835-1910)


        Slave vs. Free States in 1860


        Samuel Langhorne Clemens (1835-1910):

        Reading Twain: Compare to "reading" a Winslow Homer painting


        Winslow Homer, "Veteran in a New Field" (1865)


        Winslow Homer, "Breezing Up" (1876)


        Homer, "The Lifeline" (1884)


        Homer, Winslow
        Dressing for the Carnival (1877)

        Section 1: Huck's Situation: Chapters One to Eight, pp. 13- 63  (On- Line Edition)

        • 'sivilising Huck
        • Tom's Gang
        • Huck's Ghosts

        Homework:






        12/ 

        19

        Day 4          

        Thurs.

        EXAMS





        12/

        20

        Day 5

        Fri.

        EXAM MAKE-UP DAY

        Section 1: Huck's Situation: Chapters One to Eight, pp. 13- 63  (On- Line Edition)

        • 'sivilising Huck
        • Tom's Gang
        • Huck's Ghosts

        Homework:

        12/ 20 Day 0 Winter Break
        01/ 06 Day 6 Mon.
        01/ 07 Day 7 Tues.



        Samuel Clemens at age 13


        Mid-Year Exam 2014-15  (Exam Schedule) (Exam Location)

        Section 1: Huck's Situation: Chapters One to Eight, pp. 13- 63  (On- Line Edition)

        • 'sivilising Huck
        • Tom's Gang
        • Huck's Ghosts

        Homework:

         

         

         

         


        01/

        08

        Day 8

        Wed.







        01/

        09

        Day 9

        Thurs.

         








        Mid-Year Exam 2014-15  (Exam Schedule) (Exam Location)


        Slave vs. Free States in 1860

        Paragraph 2: America's Situation: Huck's Situation: Chapters One to Eight, pp. 13-63  (On- Line Edition)  (Notes on Slavery)  (Quiz)


        Life With Pap: America in 1876 (allegory):

        • first mention of Pap: the drowned man (24)
        • a heel print in the snow with a cross on it (27-28) (Huck's first reaction to seeing it?)
        • first description of Pap; Why does Pap want Huck back? (31)
        • What can be done to protect Huck from him? (33) (anything in Tom's books? Miss Watson's book? Judge Thatcher's law books?) Huck goes to Jim for help: the hair ball story (29)
        • What comes of Pap's attempt to get off the jug? (33-34)
        • What does Pap do when the Widow takes out a restraining order against him? What can be done about people like him?
        • The nightmare: life with Pap (the saddest thing: what does Huck think of it? What doesn't he realize?)
        • What does Huck plan to do with himself once he has escaped?(38-39)
        • Pap on the nigger and the guv'ment (39) (What is the link between poverty and racism?)
        • the D.T.'s (41)

        Huck's Escape:


        Homework:





        01/ 

        10

        Day 10

        Fri.





        Caleb Bingham, Flatboatmen on the Mississippi
         (1857)



        01/

        13

        Day 1

        Mon.





        Mid-Year Exam 2014-15  (Exam Schedule) (Exam Location)
        Huck and Jim: Chapters Nine to Sixteen, pp. 64- 116 (Googledocs )

        Outline:

        • Section 1: What is Huck's Situation at the beginning of the action?
        • Section 2: What is the relation between Huck's situation and America's situation in 1876?
        • Section 3: What does Huck need? What psychological obstacles stand in his way? How can they be overcome? What new morality is Huck learning from Jim?

        Deconstructing Race: How have Huck's attitudes about blacks been formed? (conscience)

        Jim and Huck on Jackson's Island (Twain's use of the uncanny to represent psychological states. See Freud on "The Uncanny".)

        -Jim and Huck on the Big River (Mood shift)

        • Life on the River (75): Passing St. Louis at night; stealing mushmelons and chickens
        • Stealing Chickens (vs. conventional morality) (75-76) How do Jim and Huck come to moral terms with stealing from the farms along the river bank? Is right and wrong as simple as the Widow Douglas would have it?
        • The Wrecked Steamboat Walter Scott (76-81): What is happening on it? What kind of folk do they run into every time the raft brushes up against civilization? How do Huck and Jim escape? Why does Huck decide to save the rapscallions on the boat? (81) Twain's point?
        • Huck's Orphan Story #2: about pap and mam and sis and Miss Hooker stranded on the Walter Scott.
        • Huck and Jim on King Sollermun and 'dat chile dat he 'uz gwyne to chop in two' (87) What is the point of this Bible story? What is Jim's interpretation of it? Why does Twain include this story at this moment in Huck's development?
        • What is Jim's problem with "Polly-voo-franzy"? (89-90) (Isn't it strange that a Duke and Dauphin will join Huck and Jim on the raft a little farther dowriver? What is Twain up to?)

        -To Cairo and Beyond (Huck's Crisis: Fog and Lies) (How long can this friendship last?)

        Homework:








        01/

        14

        Day 2

        Tues.







        01/

        15

        Day 3

        Wed.






        Slave vs. Free States in 1860


        Mid-Year Exam 2014-15  (Exam Schedule) (Exam Location)

        Huck Finn Review:

        Section 4: Huck and Jim Drift South: Chapters Seventeen to Twenty-Five, pp. 117-183

        What vision of America emerges as Huck and Jim drift South? What is at the root of America's problems according to Twain? How can they be overcome? Is a happy ending possible?

        The Feud Between the Grangerfords and Shepherdsons:


        Huck and Jim on the Big River (135-137) 


        Scamming America with The Duke and
        The Dauphin:

        Homework:

        The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn (1885) Mark Twain,


        For further reading:
        • Why We Don't Read Chapters Thirty-Four to Forty-One: "Mark Twain vs. Tom Sawyer" by Nick Gillespie in Reason Online (Feb 2006)

        01/

        16

        Day 4

        Thurs.


        01/
        17
        Day 5
        Fri






        Mid-Year Exam 2014-15  (Exam Schedule) (Exam Location)

        Huck Finn Review:

        The Long Lost Uncles of the Wilks Family:


        Climax of the Action:

        Ending: What was he thinking?! Forty-Two to Chapter the Last, pp. 287-296; (On- Line Edition): 

        Critical Comments:

        Homework:

        01/
        20
        Day 0
        Mon.
        M.L. KING DAY
        01/

        21

        Day 6

        Tues.

        SECOND SEMESTER BEGINS