Poverty and Literature


 

EU71


 

Spragins


 

Spring 2019

3rd Period Even Days; Drop Down Day 1


 

 

 

 

Second Semester Topics:

 


David Hilfiker, MD, Urban Injustice: How Ghettos Happen (2004)



 


Maggie: A Girl of the Streets (1892) by Stephen Crane

 


The Promised Land (1991) by Nicholas Lemann, Clarksdale and Chicago

 

 

 

 


Richard Wright (1908-1960)

Richard Wright, Native Son (1940)

Ta-Nehesi Coates, The Black Family in the Age of Mass Incarceration (2015) 

 

 

 

Jitney (1977) by August Wilson

 

 

 


MICA Center for Social Design
Urban Studies Projects

 

 

 

Month

Day

Cycle


Assignment

 

 

 

 

 

 



 

1         

21

0

Mon

Martin Luther King, Jr. Day

 

1

22

5

Tues.

 

1 23 6 Wed.

 

 

 






Boarded Row Houses in Sandtown-Winchester, Baltimore


Alejandro Aravena Pritzker Prize Winner for Architecture (2016)

 

Google Forms Preliminary Poll 

Debating the War on Poverty Fifty Years Later: 

The Heritage Foundation:: (Conservative Think Tank)
  • If Poverty is the Real Problem, Then Capitalism is the Only Solution Nov 30, 2018
  • Don’t Believe the UN’s Propaganda About "Extreme Poverty" in the U.S.
    Jul 17, 2018 
  • New Statistics Show Decline in Poverty in Trump’s First Year
    Jamie Bryan Hall Sep 13, 2018 
  • Do 5 Million Americans Really Live in Third World Poverty?
    Mar 30, 2018
The Brookings Institution: (Liberal Think Tank)
  • Children’s exposure to food insecurity is still worse than it was before the Great Recession by Lauren Bauer and Diane Whitmore Schanzenbach Friday, June 29, 2018
  • Throwing money at a problem can work, but we have to count the money we spend Gary BurtlessWednesday, July 25, 2018
  • Work requirements and safety net programs Lauren Bauer, Diane Whitmore Schanzenbach, and Jay ShambaughMonday, October 15, 2018

Homework:

 

1         

24

7

Thurs.



 

1       

25

8

Fri.


 

 

 


Redlining in Baltimore

 

Hilfiker Graded Discussion due on Wednesday, January 30th at 11:59  pm (Canvas Discussion Board)

Urban Injustice: How Ghettos Happen by David Hilfiker, MD  

Introduction:

  • What is Hilfiker’s main idea? (1)
    • improving poor people vs. social and historical structures
  • What do you think of his credentials? (2)
  • Define what Hilfiker means by "the surround". (3)
  • How did Hilfiker's political stance change over the years? (3)
  • Overall Questions: 
    • How did the Urban Ghetto take shape from the 1880's to the 1950's?
    • Despite the fact that segregation has existed throughout American history, the truly abysmal 'modern ghetto' emerged only during the last fifty years. (After the Civil Rights Movement!) Why? What happened?

Chapter One, "Building the Ghetto: A History" (Study Guide) (GoogleDocs Guide Chapter One) (Hilfiker Outline) (Blank Guide for your note taking)

Discussion: The Causes of Poverty:

  • Macro vs. Micro Effects;
  • Intended vs. Unintended; 
  • Government Action vs. Private Action
  • (Study Guide Answers)

Homework:

 

1     

28

9

Mon

 

 

1

29

10

Tues


 

 

 

Baltimore's Murphy Homes Housing Project
built in 1963



Murphy Homes Demolition (1999)
(video)

 

Urban Injustice: How Ghettos Happen by David Hilfiker, MD

Hilfiker Graded Discussion due on Wednesday, January 30th at 11:59  pm (Canvas Discussion Board)

Homework: 

Conceptions of Social Justice

1 30 1 Wed.






John Locke (1632-1704)


Adam Smith  (1723-1790)

Conceptions of Social Justice:

Homework:
Thomas Malthus (1766-1834)Jeremy Bentham (1748-1832)

 

1        

31

2

Thurs

 





Cliffdwellers  (1913) George Bellows (high resolution)


Jacob Riis, Mulberry Street


Jacob Riis, Bandit's Roost

Realism vs. Naturalism

New York City 1888:


Stephen Crane:
Homework:
For further reading:

 

2

1

3

Fri






 

2         

4

4

Mon.









Maggie: A Girl of the Streets (part oneStudy Guide
(Lecture One) (GoogleDocs Text) (GoogleDocs Study Guide)

Creative Project on on Maggie due Thursday 2/14 at 3:30 p.m (Quiz)

Silent Film Melodrama: The Little Matchgirl (1902);
D.W. Griffith, Way Down East (1920) starring Lillian Gish (ice flow finale)
  • Setting: Describe the situation of children who grow up in the Rum Alley ghetto.
  • Plot: What can you predict will happen to the heroine in a melodrama?
  • Style: Pay close attention to Crane's style: what is his perspective on his characters?
  • Character
    • Smith and Malthus and Social Darwinism
    • Locke's Epistemology: tabula rasa
    • Hard Determinism vs. Soft Determinism
    • Can you pinpoint a moment in Jimmie’s development when he could have altered the final shape of his character?
    • Can you pinpoint a moment in Maggie's development into adulthood when she could have altered the final shape of her character? 

Part One: Chapters 1-10

  • The situation of children in Rum Alley (chapters 1-3)
  • Jimmie's Fate: determined or not? (chapter 4)
  • Maggie and Pete: her version vs. reality (chapters 5-6)
  • Two Dates: the vaudeveille show and the melodrama (chapters 6-8)
    • How powerful is the shaping force of NYC culture in Maggie's mind?
    • Maggie's Choice (chapter 8)
  • The Curse (chapters 9-10)
    • Maggie 'goes teh hell'.
    • Does this choice destroy her?

Homework:

For further reading:

Bowery Boy Movies:


 

2         

5

5

Tues.







 

2         

6

6

Wed.

Parent Conference Day

 

2         

7

7

Thurs.


 

2         

8

8

Fri.

 







Stag at Sharkey's (1909) George Bellows


Typical Toughs (1890) Jacob Riis
How the Other Half Lives (1890)


Henri, Salome (1909)


Maggie: A Girl of the Streets (part two) (Quiz 2) Study Guide  (Lecture
  • Why is Maggie unable to understand her situation? What obstacle blocks her? Do you hold her responsible?

Part One: Chapters 1-10

  • The Situation of Children in Rum Alley (chapters 1-3)
  • Jimmie's Fate: determined or not? (chapter 4)
  • Maggie and Pete: her version vs. reality (chapters 5-6)
  • Two Dates: the vaudeveille show and the melodrama (chapters 6-8)
    • How powerful is the shaping force of NYC culture in Maggie's mind?
    • Remember that Maggie is a character in a melodrama.
    • Maggie's Choice (chapter 8)
  • The Curse (chapters 9-10)
    • Maggie 'goes teh hell'.
    • Does this choice destroy her?
Part Two: Chapers 11-19
  • The Bar Fight (chapter 11)
  • Pete and Maggie at the 'Hall of Irregular Shape' (chapter 12)
  • Maggie's Mortal Sin (chapter 13)
    • What does Maggie's Mom tell the judge when she is tried for public drunkeness?
  • Nell Steals Pete at the 'Hilarious Hall'
    • Describe Nellie. Why is she interested in Pete?
    • What does she think of Maggie?
    • How does Maggie react when she is ditched?
  • Return of the Prodigal Daughter (chapter 15)
    • Who accosts Jimmie on the street?
    • How is Maggie received by everyone in the neighborhood when she returns home?
  • Pete's Struggle of Conscience (chapter 16)
    • What does Pete tell Maggie when she confronts him at his bar?
    • Where can she turn?
  • Maggie's Descent to the East River (chapter 17)
  • Nell Hustles Pete (chapter 18)
    • "I allus been goo' f'ler "
    • What could Maggie have learned from Nellie?
  • Mag's Dead (chapter 19)
    • "I kin remember when she weared worsted boots."
    • "Oh, yes, I'll fergive her! I'll fergive her!"

Crane on Fate: “A man is born into this world with his own pair of eyes, and he is not responsible for his vision-- he is merely responsible for his quality of personal honesty. To keep close to honesty is my supreme ambition.”

Homework:

2100Sun.


2 11 9 Mon.
Graded Discussion on Maggie: A Girl of the Streets due Monday night 2/11 by 11:59 p.m.

 

2         

12

10

Tues.



Daumnier, At the Theatre (1864)



Graded Discussion on Maggie: A Girl of the Streets due Monday night 2/11 by 11:59 p.m.

Creative Project on on Maggie due Friday 2/22 at 3:30 p.m

Silent Film:
  • As a group, choose a key moment from the story to dramatize. (for example Maggie's impressions of her situation in the 'Hilarious Hall' (from Chapter 8).
  • Go to the passage in the story which contains that key moment and do a close reading. (see Study Guide)
  • Decide as a group whether you are going to interpret the scene as a hard or soft determinist.
  • Storyboard a shot sequence on index cards or Post-It Notes.
  • Compose the elements of each shot.
  • Brainstorm costumes, props and settings.
  • Choose music that would work well with your scene.
  • Cast your scene.
  • Be ready to shoot your scene next class.
  • Use these student films as models: 
Essay:
  • Is Maggie responsible for her fate?
  • What obstacle prevents her from understanding her situation?
  • What is to be done about the situation of young people who grow up in environments like Maggie's family and neighborhood? 
2 13 1 Wed.








Creative Project on on Maggie due Friday 2/22 at 3:30 p.m

 

2         

14

2

Thurs.




Creative Project on on Maggie due Friday 2/22 at 3:30 p.m

 

2         

15

0

Fri.

Professional Day

2 18 0 Mon. Presidents Day
2 19 3 Tues.
2 20 4 Wed.

 

 


Jacob Riis, 5 Cents a Spot  (1890)


National Child Labor Committee (1905) Lewis Hines

 

Creative Project on on Maggie due Friday 2/22 at 3:30 p.m

Photography and Ideology:

Lange, Breadline (1936)Lange,  Migrant Mother Photos
 from Farm Security Administration  Photos (1936-38) (LOC)
Masterpiece: The Making of Migrant Mother (Nerdwriter)

Homework:


 

2

21

5

Thurs.

 








 

2       

22

6

Fri.


McCormick-Deering Cotton Picker (1932)

Creative Project on on Maggie due Friday 2/22 at 3:30 p.m

Introduction to The Promised Land (1991) by Nicholas Lemann

Homework:

224Sun





Graded Discussion: Reflection on Collaboration: Maggie Melodrama due Sunday by 11:59 p.m

 

2

25

7

Mon.








 

2      

26

8

Tues.



Routes of the Great Migration




Jacob Lawrence, "The Great Migration: A Story in Paintings (1940-41)




Jacob Lawrence, "The Great Migration: A Story in Paintings

Graded Discussion: The Promised Land due on Friday, March 8th by 11:59 p.m.

Conceptions of Social Justice:

Nicholas Lemann, The Promised Land (1991)

Clarksdale (pp 3-31)
(Study Guide(Googledoc Guide) (Answers)

General Questions:

  • What influence did the 'surround' of the segregated South have upon the people who moved from Clarksdale to Chicago? Does Lemann believe that ‘a culture of poverty’ existed in the South? 
  • How does Lemann's selection of anecdotes about the folk from Clarksdale who moved to Chicago support his thesis?
  • Does Lemann’s use of these anecdotes an accurate reflection of why concentrated poverty overtook the black neighborhoods of Chicago's South and West Sides?
  • According to Lemann, how did the public housing debacle in Chicago develop?To what degree does Lemann hold Mayor Daley and the city government responsible for the coming catastrophe?
  • What would Isabel Wilkerson think? How about Hilfiker and Crane?
  • Identify the position on social justice that you are taking: classical liberal, radical liberal, or socialist.
Analyze why Lemann chose these people to represent the millions of African-Americans who moved north during the Great Migration:
  • Ruby Daniels
  • Uless Carter
  • George Hicks
  • Bennie Gooden
  • Aaron Henry

Homework:








 

2

27

9

Wed.

 

2

28

10

Thurs.

 

 








 

Graded Discussion: The Promised Land due on Friday, March 8th by 11:59 p.m.

Lemann, The Promised Land Clarksdale (pp, 32-58) (Study Guide(Googledoc Guide) (Answers)

Key Questions:

  • What influence did the environment of the segregated South have upon the people who moved from Clarksdale to Chicago?
  • Does Lemann believe that ‘a culture of poverty’ existed in the South?
  • What role does the family structure have on the transmission of poverty from generation to generation?
  • Would Lemann recommend government intervention to address the problems of poverty which emerged in the cities? If so, how?
  • Is Lemann’s history of the Great Migration accurate?
Lemann's Answers:
Lemann's Character Selection in The Promised Land:

Analyze why Lemann chose these people to represent the millions of African-Americans who moved north during the Great Migration:
  • Ruby Daniels
  • Uless Carter
  • Connie Henry
  • George Hicks
  • Bennie Gooden
  • Aaron Henry

Homework:

Check out:

The Blues Go North

 

3         

1

1

Fri.



Apartment Building in Chicago's
"Black Belt" (LOC)


Chicago South Side Map

Graded Discussion: The Promised Land due on Friday, March 8th by 11:59 p.m.

Lemann, The Promised Land  Chicago (59-107) (Study Guide) (GoogleDoc Guide)

Key Questions:


  • How does his selection of anecdotes about the folk from Clarksdale who moved to Chicago support his thesis?

  • According to Lemann, how did the public housing debacle in Chicago develop?

  • What would Hilfiker think? How about Crane?
  • Chicago's Demographic Divide: see The Racial Dot Map from 2010 Census

Lemann's Character Selection in The Promised Land:

Analyze why Lemann chose these people to represent the millions of African-Americans who moved north during the Great Migration:

  • Ruby Daniels
  • Uless Carter
  • Connie Henry
  • George Hicks
  • Bennie Gooden
  • Aaron Henry

Homework:

330Sun.

 

3

4

2

Mon.

 

 

Robert Taylor Homes (1962)


The Robert Taylor Homes
1962- 1993


The Vice Lords at the Robert Taylor Homes
Graded Discussion: The Promised Land due on Friday, March 8th by 11:59 p.m.

Lemann, The Promised Land Chicago (59-107)   (Study Guide) (GoogleDoc Guide

Chicago's Demographic Divide

Key Questions:
  • What influence did the 'surround' of the segregated South have upon the people who moved from Clarksdale to Chicago? Does Lemann believe that ‘a culture of poverty’ existed in the South? 
  • What role does family structure have on the transmission of poverty from generation to generation?
  • Would Lemann recommend government intervention to address the problems of poverty which emerged in the cities? If so, how?
  • How does Lemann's selection of anecdotes about the folk from Clarksdale who moved to Chicago support his thesis?
  • Does Lemann’s use of these anecdotes provide an accurate reflection of why concentrated poverty overtook the black neighborhoods of Chicago's South and West Sides? 
  • To what degree does Lemann hold Mayor Daley and the city government responsible for the coming catastrophe?
  • Is Lemann’s history of the Great Migration accurate?
  • What would Isabel Wilkerson think? How about Hilfiker and Crane?
  • Identify the position on social justice that you are taking: classical liberal, radical liberal, or socialist.
Homework:

Reviews of The Warmth of Other Suns (2010) by Isabel Wilkerson's? How does she explain the emergence of the terrible ghettoes at the end of the 20th century?

3

5

3

Tues.

 

3

6

4

Wed.

 





Graded Discussion: The Promised Land: Clarksdale and Chicago due on Friday, March 8th by 11:59 p.m.

Lemann, The Promised Land Chicago (59-107) (Study Guide) (GoogleDoc Guide)

Reviews of The Warmth of Other Suns (2010) by Isabel Wilkerson's? How does she explain the emergence of the terrible ghettoes at the end of the 20th century?

An alternative vision: The characters chosen by Isabel Wilerson for her history of the Great Migration: The Warmth of Other Suns (2010). It includes the biographies of three persons: 

  • Ida Mae Brandon Gladney, a sharecropper's wife who left Mississippi in the 1930s for Chicago. 
  • George Swanson Starling, an agricultural worker and union organizer who left Florida for New York City in the 1940s.
  • Robert Joseph Pershing Foster, a doctor who left Louisiana in the early 1950s, moving to Los Angeles.
Respond to questions as a group on the Isabel Wilkerson padlet.
  • What influence did the 'surround' of the segregated South have upon the people who moved north during the Great Migration? 
  • What does Wilkerson's selection of Ida Mae, George, and Pershing to represent the six million people who moved teach us about the character of the Great Migration?
  • Does Wilkerson believe that a 'culture of poverty' moved from the plantations of the South to the ghettos of the North?
  • How does Wilkerson explain the emergence of neighborhoods of concentrated poverty in the urban ghettos?
  • How might Lemann respond to Wilkerson's history of the Great Migration?
Homework:
3 7 5 Thurs. A Raisin in the Sun at Coppin State

 

3         

8

6

Fri.



Demolition of the Murphy Homes High Rise Project in West Baltimore (1996)

PHOTO ESSAY: Demolished: The end of Chicago’s public housing
by David Eads and Helga Salinas photos by Patricia Evans (2014)


From Bronzeville to Clybourne Park:
the Younger family's move.

Scenes from The Wire (2004-08)
Graded Discussion: The Promised Land: Clarksdale and Chicago due on Friday, March 8th by 11:59 p.m.

Graded Discussion Questions:

  • What influence did the 'surround' of the segregated South have upon the people who moved from Clarksdale to Chicago? 
  • What role does ‘a culture of poverty’ have on the transmission of poverty from generation to generation?
  • Would Lemann recommend government intervention to address the problems of poverty which emerged in the cities? If so, how?
  • Does Lemann’s use of  anecdotes about the migrants from Clarksdale to Chicago provide an accurate reflection of why concentrated poverty overtook the black neighborhoods of Chicago's South and West Sides? 
  • To what degree does Lemann hold Mayor Daley and the city government responsible for the coming catastrophe?
  • Is Lemann’s history of the Great Migration accurate?
  • What would Isabel Wilkerson think? How about Hilfiker and Crane?
  • Identify the position on social justice that you are taking: classical liberal, radical liberal, or socialist.

Backgrounds to Richard Wright

Homework:


For further reading:

 

3         

11

7

Mon.







 

3

12

8

Tues.


 

 


Richard Wright (1908-1960)


The Skywriter

Bigger Meets Mary


The Night Ride

 

Graded Discussion: The Trial of Bigger Thomas due Friday March 15th by 11:59 p.m.

James Baldwin, "Everybody's Protest Novel" from Notes of a Native Son (1948)

Wright, Native Son, Book One: "Fear" (Study Guide) (Quotes) (Discussion)

  • Saturday Morning in the Thomas’ Apartment (3-12) 
    • The Kitchenette Apartment
    • The Rat
    • The Situation of the Thomas Family
  • On the Street  (12-22)
    • Symbol: The Poster and the Skywriter
    • The feeling in Bigger's Gut
    • Bigger and Gus Playing Generals
  • The Pool Hall (22- 29)
    • Blum's Delicatessen
    • The Vicious Cycle of Bigger's Thinking
  • At The Movies (29-34)
    • The Surreal Newsreel
    • Fantasizing about Jan and Mary
  • Terrorizing Gus (34-41)
    • Why does Bigger attack Gus?
    • What is the relationship between racism and Black on black violence"
    • Can Bigger process what he has done?
  • The Interview (42-51)
    • The Gun
    • What does Bigger think off this job opportunity?
    • What role does Bigger play during the interview?
  • Mary, Peggy and the Blind Woman  (51-62)
    • How does Bigger respond to meeting Mary?
    • What makes encounters with Mrs. Dalton so eerie?
  • The Night Ride with Mary and Jan  (62-80)
    • What is so wrong about the way Mary and Jan treat Bigger?
    • Why is Bigger humiliated at Ernie's Chicken Shack?
    • How demeaning is it for Bigger to 'chauffeur' Mary and an around the Park?
  • Bigger and Mary Stumble Towards Bed  (80-87)
    • What conflicting feelings possess Bigger as he helps Mary to bed?
    • Could Bigger have done anything differently?
  • The Furnace (87-93)
    • Note the ways that Wright imbues this scene with horror.

Homework:


 

3

13

9

Wed.

 

 

 

3

14

10

Thurs.

 


Bigger and Gus


The Night Ride


The Drive Way


The Bedroom

Wright, Native Son, Book One: "Fear"  (Study Guide(Quotes) (Discussion)

Graded Discussion: The Trial of Bigger Thomas due Friday, March 15th by 11:59 p.m.

When is punishment is justified?

  • Did the perpetrator intend to commit the crime? (intention)
  • Did he understand what he was doing at the moment he committed the crime? (knowledge)
  • Did he have any other option? (control)
QUESTION ONE:
What charge should be brought against Bigger Thomas for his killing and dismembering of Mary Dalton?

  • First-degree murder: any intentional murder that is willful and premeditated with malice aforethought.
  • Felony murder: a charge that may be filed against a defendant who is involved in a dangerous crime where a death results from the crime] is typically first-degree.
  • Second-degree murder: any intentional murder with malice aforethought, but is not premeditated or planned in advance.
  • Voluntary manslaughter: sometimes called a crime of passion murder, is an intentional killing that involves no prior intent to kill, and which was committed under such circumstances that would "cause a reasonable person to become emotionally or mentally disturbed".
  • Involuntary manslaughter: a killing that stems from a lack of intention to cause death but involving an intentional or negligent act leading to death. The killer did not intend for death to result from their intentional actions.

QUESTION TWO:
What combination of the principles of punishment should be used to determine a just consequence for Bigger's crime?

  • Retribution: Punishment is called for because the moral or legal violator deserves to be penalized.
  • Deterrence: Punishment serves as an effective disincentive for the individual and other potential criminals. The pain of punishment is offset by the benefit for society as a whole
  • Restitution: In response to this disruption of the social order, what can be done to restore the victim of a crime
  • Rehabilitation: What can be done to restore the offender to a situation of pro-sociality?

QUESTION THREE:
To what extent is inner city violence directly related to the psychological effects of systemic racism?

 

3

15

1

Fri.


Graded Discussion: The Trial of Bigger Thomas due Friday March 15th by 11:59 p.m.
3 16 0 Sat. SPRING BREAK






3 25 0 Mon. SPRING BREAK

 

3

26

2

Tues.


 


Time Magazine Aug. 29, 1977



The Underclass Debate:
  • "The Underclass"- a group beyond the help of government
  • Term emerges in 1977-82 era
  • Time: drugs, crime, teen pregnancy, unemployed, socially alienated, school dropouts, welfare moms, urban decay, black hole of welfare spending.
  • Ken Auletta in 1977 Time Magazine article entitled "The American Underclass" suggested that a whole class of people were emerging in the inner city who might be beyond the reach of any form of help: the passive poor, hostile street criminals, hustlersdrunks/addicts/homeless.
Homework:
3 27 3 Wed.

 

3

28

4

Thurs.

 

 


Ta-Nehesi Coates


Wendy Sawyer and Peter Wagner, Mass Incarceration: The Whole Pie 2019  
Prison Policy Initiative  March 19, 2019
Nicholas Lemann, The Underclass Debate from The Promised Land (1991) pp. 280-291

Ta-Nehesi Coates, The Black Family in the Age of Mass Incarceration The Atlantic (2015)

Chapters:

  1. “Lower-class behavior in our cities is shaking them apart.”

  2. “We are incarcerating too few criminals.”

  3. “You don’t take a shower after 9 o’clock.”

  4. “The crime-stained blackness of the Negro”

  5. The “baddest generation any society has ever known.”

  6. “It’s like I’m in prison with him.”

  7. “Our value system became surviving versus living.”

  8. “The Negro poor having become more openly violent.”

  9. “Now comes the proposition that the Negro is entitled to damages

For Further Reading;
  • The Moynihan Report: An Annotated Edition by Daniel Geary Sep 14 2015 A historian unpacks The Negro Family: The Case for National Action on its 50th anniversary

 

3   

29

5

Fri.

End of 3rd Quarter

 

4         

1

6

Mon.


 


Ta-Nehesi Coates
Ta-Nehesi Coates, The Black Family in the Age of Mass Incarceration The Atlantic (2015)

Chapters:

  1. “Lower-class behavior in our cities is shaking them apart.”

  2. “We are incarcerating too few criminals.”

  3. “You don’t take a shower after 9 o’clock.”

  4. “The crime-stained blackness of the Negro”

  5. The “baddest generation any society has ever known.”

  6. “It’s like I’m in prison with him.”

  7. “Our value system became surviving versus living.”

  8. “The Negro poor having become more openly violent.”

  9. “Now comes the proposition that the Negro is entitled to damages

  • The Tragedy of Baltimore By Alec MacGillis March 12, 2019
    Since Freddie Gray’s death in 2015, violent crime has spiked to levels unseen for a quarter century. Inside the crackup of an American city.

 

4         

2

7

Tues.


 

4         

3

8

Wed.

 


Shantay Guy and her stepson, Da’mon, who was wounded in a shooting in October.


Erricka Bridgeford, the organizer of Baltimore Ceasefire, doing a spiritual cleanse at the site of a recent murder.
The Tragedy of Baltimore By Alec MacGillis March 12, 2019
Since Freddie Gray’s death in 2015, violent crime has spiked to levels unseen for a quarter century. Inside the crackup of an American city.

 

4         

4

9

Thurs.

 

 

4         

5

10

Fri.

 


August Wilson (1945-2005)

August Wilson Backgrounds

Jitney (1977; 1997)

Homework:

 

4         

8

1

Mon.



Bearden, Rocket to the Moon (1971)


The Cast of Jitney

Act One of Jitney (Study Guide)

The Day the Thunderstorm Breaks:
  • Today's the day that Becker will announce to his drivers that the Urban Renewal is moving in, he's moving out, and he's not sure that he wants to keep the business going.
  • Today's the day that Fielding finally gets himself fired.
  • Today's the day that the feud between Youngblood and Turnbo breaks wide open.
  • Today's the day that Rena confronts Youngblood with her suspicions about his running around with Peaches.
  • Today's the day that Becker's boy, Booster, is getting out of the penitentiary and coming home to meet his father.

Thesis: How are the strands of the action inter-related? (ie, is it just an accident that each of these thunderheads breaks simultaneously?)

  • Act One Scene One
    • The Hill District comes alive.
  • Act One Scene Two
    • What has pushed Turnbo over the edge today? (Look at his rant about respect. (30-31)) What does he tell Rena?
    • Why has Rena run out of patience with Youngblood? What was the straw which broke the camel's back for her? (32-35)
    • Why is Becker thinking about giving up after the city let him know that they were gonna board up the place the first of the month? (36)
    • Who did Booster kill? Why? (39)
  • Act One Scene Three
    • How does the fight between Youngblood and Turnbo break out? (43)
    • Describe the way Becker functions in this neighborhood: what makes his presence essential?
    • How does Fielding get himself fired? (51) Who does he dream about twenty years later? (53)
    • Becker and Booster
Homework:
4 9 2 Tues.



Bearden, Rocket to the Moon (1971)


The Cast of Jitney

Act One of Jitney (Study Guide)

The Day the Thunderstorm Breaks:
  • Today's the day that Becker will announce to his drivers that the Urban Renewal is moving in, he's moving out, and he's not sure that he wants to keep the business going.
  • Today's the day that Fielding finally gets himself fired.
  • Today's the day that the feud between Youngblood and Turnbo breaks wide open.
  • Today's the day that Rena confronts Youngblood with her suspicions about his running around with Peaches.
  • Today's the day that Becker's boy, Booster, is getting out of the penitentiary and coming home to meet his father.

Thesis: How are the strands of the action inter-related? (ie, is it just an accident that each of these thunderheads breaks simultaneously?)

  • Act One Scene One
    • The Hill District comes alive.
  • Act One Scene Two
    • What has pushed Turnbo over the edge today? (Look at his rant about respect. (30-31)) What does he tell Rena?
    • Why has Rena run out of patience with Youngblood? What was the straw which broke the camel's back for her? (32-35)
    • Why is Becker thinking about giving up after the city let him know that they were gonna board up the place the first of the month? (36)
    • Who did Booster kill? Why? (39)
  • Act One Scene Three
    • How does the fight between Youngblood and Turnbo break out? (43)
    • Describe the way Becker functions in this neighborhood: what makes his presence essential?
    • How does Fielding get himself fired? (51) Who does he dream about twenty years later? (53)
    • Becker and Booster
Homework:

 

4         

10

3

Wed.




4
11
4
Thurs.



Spring Way (1966) Romare Bearden


The Street (1975)

Act One Conclusion: Becker and Booster: Booker vs. Malcolm

Act Two of Jitney (Study Guide) (Quiz)

Connections to African American History:

Homework

 

4         

12

5

Fri.



4 15 6 Mon.

 

4         

16

7

Tues.


 

4         

17

8

Wed.


 

4         

18

9

Thurs.


 

4

19

0

Fri.

GOOD FRIDAY/PASSOVER

4 22 0 Mon. PROFESSIONAL DAY

 

4

23

10

Tues.

 

 

4

24

1

Wed.


 

4

25

2

Thurs


4 26 3 Fri.
2016 Urban Studies Projects

 

4

29

4

Mon.

AP's

4 30 5 Tues AP's

 

5

1

6

Wed.

AP's




MICA Center for Social Design


Housing Works (Brooklyn, NYC)
MICA Urban Design Preentation:

Directions:
  • Prepare a report (presentation) in which you describe how the following social entrepreneurs are making a difference in their communities. 
  • As part of your presentation, list the kind of projects each of the following groups have sponsored.
  • Try to find video to include in your presentation.
Social Entrepreneurs:
5 2 7 Thurs. AP's

 

5

3

8

Fri.

AP's


Theaster Gates

Artist Theaster Gates Turns Chicago’s Empty Spaces into Incubators for Culture (PBS Newshour 4-26-16)
Presentations on Social Entrepreneurship:
Homework:

Begin Work on Social Entrepreneurship Projects
5 6 9 Mon. AP's

 

5

7

10

Tues.

AP Exams

Work on Social Entrepreneurship Projects

 

5

8

1

Wed.

AP Exams



Dosomething.org

Thanks to Our Brand New App, Young People Can Make an Immediate Impact on the News That Affects Them Most

Homework:

 

5

9

2

Thurs.

AP Exams

Final  Presentations:
Social Entrepreneurship Projects:

 

5

10

3

Fri.

AP Exams

 

5

13

4

Mon.

 AP Exams

 

 

5

14

5

Tues.

AP EXAMS

 

5

15

6

Wed.

AP EXAMS

 

5

16

7

Thurs.

SENIOR EXAMS

 

5

17

8

Fri.

SENIOR EXAMS

 

 

 

 

 


5 20 9 Mon AWARDS DAY

 

5

21

10

Tues.

ENCOUNTER BEGINS

 

5

22

1

Wed.

 

5 23 2 Thurs.

 

5

24

3

Fri.


 

5

27

0

Mon.

MEMORIAL DAY

5 28 4 Tues.
5 29 5 Wed.
5 30 6 Thurs. READING DAY

 

5

31

7

Fri.

EXAMS

 

6

3

8

Mon.

EXAMS

 

6

4

9

Tues.

EXAMS

6 5 10 Wed. EXAMS

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

6

6

1

 Thurs.

EXAM MAKEUP DAY










6 7 2 Fri FACULTY MEETINGS
6 8 Sat. Baccalureate
6 9 Sun. Graduation