new shield.JPG

Carey Hall Room 202
Office Hours: 2:15-3:30 p.m. (daily)
jspragins@gilman.edu
 
(443) 608-8068 

ODD DAYS: First Period

EVEN DAYS: Second Period

4th Period Classes: Days 3,4,7,10

“Out of the crooked timber of humanity no straight thing
was ever made.” - Kant

European Humanities
EH31


Spragins


Spring 2017



Spring Outline:


The French Revolution
David, Jacques-Louis
Death of Marat (1793)
Musees Royaux des Beaux-Arts de Belgique
(Smarthistory)

 

The French Revolution

 

 


English Romantic Poetry
Blake, William
The Ancient of Days 1794
British Museum, London

Romanticism (Intellectual Backgrounds) 
English Romantic Poetry (Table of Contents)


Nineteenth Century Ideologies 
The Industrial Revolution
Manchester Factory Kids
(1836)

 

The Industrial Revolution and
Nineteenth Century Ideologies

Poe  
Holmes 
Gogol

 

africablack'satlas.jpg
Heart of Darkness (1899) Josef Conrad
Africa in 1885 from Black's Atlas of the World 

 

The Modern Era:

 

Ruined  (2008) by Lynn Nottage


The Origins of World War Two
Hitler Campaign Poster 1932

 

The Test of Liberalism 

 


survival
Survival in Auschwitz (1947)

by Primo Levi (1919-1987)
 

 

 

Survival in Auschwitz (1947) by Primo Levi

Final Exam 2017



Month

Day

Cycle


Assignment



1
23
Day 6

Mon.
Exam Make-up Day

1         

24

Day 7

Tues.




tennis.jpg
David, The Tennis Court Oath (1789)


Francois Rude, La Marseillaise, Arc de Triomphe, Paris, 1833-1836.


Napoleon at St. Bernard 1800



Second Semester Preview: Artifacts Essay Site

The Enlightenment Dream:

- Man is not born in a sinful, depraved state.
- The end of life is life itself: the good life on earth, not life after death in heaven.
- Man is capable, guided solely by the light of reason and experience, of perfecting life on earth.
- To accomplish this great goal, we must free our minds from the bonds of ignorance and superstition and our bodies from the oppression of corrupt social authorities.

The French Revolution:

Homework:

To prepare for the Final Exam, read Isaiah Berlin:






125Day 8Wed.



Jean-Jacques Rousseau (1712-1778)

white_conjuror
John White
Roanoake Watercolor (1586)


Second Semester Preview: Artifacts Essay Site

The Enlightenment Dream:

- Man is not born in a sinful, depraved state.
- The end of life is life itself: the good life on earth, not life after death in heaven.
- Man is capable, guided solely by the light of reason and experience, of perfecting life on earth.
- To accomplish this great goal, we must free our minds from the bonds of ignorance and superstition and our bodies from the oppression of corrupt social authorities.

Jean-Jacques Rousseau:


Homework: Reports on the French Revolution  

Outline of the French Revolution (Powerpoint)

1
26
Day 9
Thurs.




Villeneuve, Matière à réflection pour les jongleurs couronnees (Matter for thought for crowned twisters), 1793


Execution of Louis XVI
21 January 1793,  from Decaux
.


The French Revolution: Outline of the French Revolution (Powerpoint)


Summary (Notes from Palmer):

 

Research Reports on the French Revolution  (Study Guide)


The French Revolution, Richard Hooker (2ndary) Study Guide

Homework:






127Day 10Fri.



Jacques- Louis David, "The Death of Socrates", 1788

(see video analysis from Nerdwriter1)


Jacques-Louis David,
Oath of the Horatii, 1784.  11' x 14'. Louvre, Paris

tennis.jpg
David, The Tennis Court Oath (1789)


France:

The most advanced country in Europe

The wealthiest country in Europe

The intellectual center of the Enlightenment

The French Revolution:

Summary (Notes from Palmer):


The Liberal Revolution (1789-1792)
  • The Estates General
  • The National Assembly
  • The Capture of the Bastille
  • The Great Fear
  • Declaration of the Rights of Man
  • The Civil Constitution of the Clergy
  • The Constitution of 1791

Excerpts from Declaration of the Rights of Man and Citizen (1789)

Voltaire on Enlightened Despotism: "I would rather be ruled by a single lion than by a thousand rats."


Homework:
  • Essay: Voltaire and Rousseau on the French Revolution due at 3:30 p.m. on Friday

 






130Day 10Mon.



Robespierre (6 May 1758–28 July 1794)


A Sans-cullote Louis-Léopold Boilly (1761-1845).


The Situation in France, Summer 1792




The Radical Revolution (1792-1794)

French Revolution Maps 
Outline of the French Revolution (Powerpoint)
Reports on the French Revolution

Excerpts from Robespierre’s Speech of February 5,1794

Summary (Notes from Palmer):


The Radical Revolution (Hooker)  Study Guide
  • The Declaration of Pillnitz
  • Counter Revolution
  • The Girondists
  • The Montagnard
  • The Sans-culottes
  • The Reign of Terror
  • The Levee en Masse

Homework:

  • Essay: Voltaire and Rousseau on the French Revolution due at 3:30 p.m. on Friday

 

Piano Sonata #14 Moonlight

1st Movement

Piano Sonata #8 Pathetique 1st movement

Beethoven: Symphony No. 5 (Karajan / BPO)

 Beethoven,  3rd Symphony (Eroica) 1st Movement (part one) (1803)

 


The French Revolution
David, Jacques-Louis
Death of Marat (1793)
Musees Royaux des Beaux-Arts de Belgique
(Smarthistory)






131Day 2Tues.



Napoleon at St. Bernard  (1800)

(David Powerpoint)


David, Consecration of the Emperor Napoleon I on 2 Dec 1804 (1806)


 Turner, The Battle of Trafalgar, as seen from the mizzen starboard shrouds of the Victory  (1806 to 1808)


RoubaudRaevsky Battery during the Battle of Borodino (1912)


Northen, Napoleon's Retreat from Moscow


Napoleon (1799-1814)
 

Outline of the French Revolution (Powerpoint)
Reports on the French Revolution  
French Revolution Maps


Summary (Notes from Palmer):


Napoleonics:
 
Napoleon (Hooker) Study Guide

  • The Thermidorean Reaction
  • Napoleon Bonaparte
  • The Consulate (1799-1804)
  • The Napoleonic Code
  • The Empire
  • The Hundred Days


Ideologies of the French Revolution (review)

 

Homework:

  • Essay: Voltaire and Rousseau on the French Revolution due Friday at 3:30

For further reading:

napoleon_map.bmp
Napoleon's Conquests

Eur1815.jpg
Europe in 1815






21Day 3Wed.



Friedrich, Caspar David
Wanderer Above the Sea of Fog (1818)


Fussli, The Nightmare 1781


Essay: Voltaire and Rousseau on the French Revolution due Friday at 3:30


Ideologies of the French Revolution (review)

French Revolution Quiz


Reactions to the French Revolution:

  • Revolutionary Movements Worldwide
  • The Congress of Vienna
  • Edmund Burke and Modern Conservatism
  • Johan Fichte and German Nationalism

Romanticism:

Painting from the Enlightenment to Romanticism

Homework:

  • Work on French Rev Essay
2
2
Day 4
Thurs.

2         

3

Day 5

Fri..



David Hume (1711-1776)


Immanuel Kant (1724-1804)


Georg Wilhelm Friedrich Hegel (1770-1831)
French Rev Essay due at 3:30 p.m.

Hume, Kant and Hegel: Intellectual Backgrounds to Romanticism (Perry) (Study Guide) (Googledocs Study Guide)

For further reading:


For future philosophers:

Kant: A New Epistemology (Theory of Learning)


2
6
Day 6

Mon.


blake_lamb.JPG
Blake, William
The Lamb from
Songs of Innocence and Experience (1789)

blake_tyger.jpg
William Blake, "The Tyger"  from Songs of Innocence and Experience (1789)

Introduction to Romanticism:

"What if you slept? And what if, in your sleep, you dreamed? And what if, in your dream, you went to heaven and there plucked a strange and beautiful flower? And what if, when you awoke, you had the flower in your hand? Ah, what then?" -- Samuel Taylor Coleridge

Backgrounds to Romantic Poetry: Sophie on Romanticism

Hume, Kant and Hegel: Intellectual Backgrounds to Romanticism (Perry) (Study Guide) (Googledocs Study Guide) (Quiz)

Multi-Media Essay on Romantic Poetry (Due Thursday 2/23)

William Blake (1757-1827): Introduction

Homework:

William Blake (1757-1827) Introduction;  Songs of Innocence and Experience (1789) The Blake Archive (website)

Write a paragraph about one of the following poems:

1.      Read the poem carefully. Look up any unfamiliar words in the dictionary.

2.      What is the poem's theme? What point is being made?

3.      What symbols does the poet use to make his point?

4.      Read your poem out loud. What musical devices does the poet use to help make his point?

5.      What makes the poem Romantic?

Songs of Innocence and Experience (1789)

2         

7

Day 7

Tues. 

Parent Conference Day
28Day 8Wed.


blake_great_red_dragon.jpg
Blake, William
The Great Red Dragon and the Woman Clothed in Sun c. 1806-1809

Beethoven, 9th Symphony, First Movement,  Third Movement (Scherzo), Fourth Movement "Ode to Joy" (1, 2, 3) (1817-24);  Piano Sonata #14 Moonlight  1st Movement;  Piano Sonata #8 Pathetique 1st movement

Beethoven, Fifth Symphony 1st Movement (1805-08)

blake_london.jpg
William Blake,
  "London" from Songs of Innocence and Experience (1789)


Multi-Media Essay on Romantic Poetry (Due Thursday 2/23)

Backgrounds to Romantic Poetry: Sophie on Romanticism

English Romantic Poetry (Table of Contents)

William Blake (1757-1827)


"The Lamb" vs. "The Tyger"

"The Chimney Sweeper" vs. "The Chimney Sweeper"

"Holy Thursday" vs. "Holy Thursday"

"The Divine Image"vs. "The Human Abstract"

The Little Girl Lost vs. The Little Girl Found

"The Garden of Love"  vs. "The Sick Rose"

Homework: Blake Creative Writing Exercise

 For further reading: 


2
9
Day 9

Thurs.




Blake, "The Sick Rose" from
Songs of Innocence and Experience (1789)


Blake, "Garden of Love" from
Songs of Innocence and Experience (1789)


Multi-Media Essay on Romantic Poetry (Due Thursday 2/23)

Kant's Categorical Imperative (Nieman)

Blake Creative Writing Exercise

Old English Popular Ballads: (Ballad definition)

Sophie on Romanticism 
Wordsworth and Coleridge, Lyrical Ballads (1798) 
Romantic Paintings: Ballad Prompts

Homework:

Creative Writing: Ballad Assignment


For further reading: Old English Ballads:


Classicism vs. Romanticism
  • Sonata Form: Four Movements (Fast; Slow; Dance; Fast)
  • Movement Form: (Exposition; Development; Recapitulation; Coda)

Mozart, Symphony #40 in G Minor, K. 550 (1788) 

Beethoven, 5th Symphony  in C Minor (1808)

2         

10

 Day 10

Fri.





Turner, Slavers throwing overboard the Dead and Dying - Typhon coming on ("The Slave Ship") 1840 

friedrich_sea.jpg
Friedrich, Caspar David The Sea of Ice (1823-25)


Gustave Dore's Illustrations to the Rime of the Ancient Mariner (1870)


Multi-Media Essay on Romantic Poetry (Due Thursday 2/23)

 

Romantic Paintings: Ballad Prompts


Amistad (1987) (dir. Steven Spielberg)


Wordsworth and Coleridge, Lyrical Ballads (1798) 

 

Gustave Dore's Illustrations to the Rime of the Ancient Mariner (1870)

Orson Welles Reads Coleridge’s “The Rime of the Ancient Mariner” in a 1977 Experimental Film

 

Homework:

 

Coleridge, "Kubla Khan" (1797)


Fourth Period:


For further reading:






2         

13

 Day 1

Mon.





Delacroix, Eugene
The Death of Sardanapalous (1827)


victoria_falls.jpg
Victoria Falls on the Zambezi River between Zambia and Zimbabwe. The falls plunge more than 400 feet.

Kubla_khan_text.jpg
Original text of Kubla Khan in Coleridge's hand (
British Museum)


Multi-Media Essay on Romantic Poetry (Due Thursday 2/23)

Wordsworth and Coleridge, Lyrical Ballads (1798) 
Close Analysis: Coleridge: "Kubla Khan" (1797)

Discussion:

  • How do both "The Rime of the Ancient Mariner" and "Kubla Khan" express Coleridge’s understanding of human nature?
  • How does Coleridge use symbol in each poem?
  • How does the sound of each poem contribute to its meaning?
  • What makes these poems “Romantic”?


Close Analysis: Wordsworth's Ballads: "We are Seven" (1798)   Landscapes by John Constable

Homework:

  • Write a paragraph about one of the follwing poems by William Wordsworth. Tell us what his poetic purpose is and how it is Romantic.

Wordsworth from Lyrical Ballads (1798): 

For further reading: Wordsworth's Meditative Poetry: 

For further study:

Early Romanticism in Music 





2         

14

 Day 2

Tues.





Greuze, The Village Proposal (1761)


Constable,
The Haywain (1821)


Constable, The White Horse (1819)


Multi-Media Essay on Romantic Poetry (Due Thursday 2/23)

William Wordsworth:


Homework:


The Gleaners Millet (1857)

2 15  Day 3
Wed.



The Parthenon Marbles (447BC - 432BC)


Severn, Keats Listens to a Nightingale (1845)



Multi-Media Essay on Romantic Poetry (Due Thursday 2/23)

The Life of John Keats (Powerpoint):


Homework:





2         

16

 Day 3

Thurs.





The Parthenon Frieze
(447BC - 432BC)


Dionysus and Maenad 486.BC


Multi-Media Essay on Romantic Poetry  (Due Thursday 2/23)

Writing Like Keats

Keats Odes: Study Guide;  Keats Lecture Notes

"To Autumn" (1819)
"On Melancholy" (1819)
"To a Nightingale" (1819) (poetic effects)
"On a Grecian Urn
" (1819)

 

An excellent Keats webpage.

Homework:

Essay Workshop:

 

A Musical Analogue? Frederic Chopin (1810-1849)






2         

17

 Day 4

Fri.

Professional Day
220 Day 0Mon.Presidents Day
221 Day 5Tues.



Gericault, An Officer of the Imperial
Horse Guards Charging (1814)


Multi-Media Essay on Romantic Poetry (Due Thursday 2/23)

Essay Workshop:

 
Homework:






2

22

 Day 6

Wed.





Friedrich, Caspar David
Wanderer Above the Sea of Fog 1818


Essay Workshop: Multi-Media Essay on Romantic Poetry


Homework:

  • Essay Due on Thursday at 3:30 p.m.

 






2

23

 Day 7

Thurs.


delacroix_liberty.jpg
Delacroix, Eugene
Liberty Leading the People (1830)

Eur1815.jpg
Europe in 1815

Romanticism Essay Due at 3:30 p.m.

Romanticism:

Political Backgrounds to the Industrial Revolution:

 

I.                  Review: Ideologies of the French Revolution

II.                Europe in 1815: The Congress of Vienna: Reassertion of Conservatism


Homework:

2

24

 Day 8

Fri.


raft_of_the_medusa.jpg
Gericault, Theodore
The Raft of the Medusa (1819)
2
27
 Day 9
Mon.



turner_fighting_temeraire.jpg
Turner, Fighting Temeraire (1838)

Turner, Rain, Steam and Speed -The Great North-Western Railway (1844) (See Smarthistory Video

Stephenson's_Rocket.jpg
Stephenson's Steam Locomotive: "The Rocket" (1828)

industrialization_europe_1850.gif
Industrialization in Europe 1850



"Every individual is continually exerting himself to find out the most advantageous employment for whatever capital he can command. It is his own advantage, indeed, and not that of society, which he has in view. But the study of his own advantage, naturally or necessarily, leads him to prefer that employment which is most advantageous to the society.... By pursuing his own interest he frequently promotes that of society more effectually than he intends to promote it.” (Adam Smith, The Wealth of Nations)

19th c. Ideologies

The Zeitgeist of the Early 19th Century: 

Choose Industrial Revolution Project Groups.

The Enlightenment philosophes had argued that the application of science and reason would lead to a better society for all. Did the extraordinary changes wrought by the Industrial Revolution represent progress? (Decide as a group whether your definition of progress will be grounded in a classical liberal, radical liberal or socialist political philosophy.)

Homework:

Industrial Revolution Group Projects
Industrial Revolution Links 
Presentation Ground Rules

spinning_jenny.jpg

industrial_england_early_19thc..gif

Spinning Jenny by T. E. Nicholson (1835)

Industrial England Early 19th c.


2
28
 Day 10
Tues.




The Crystal Palace
at The Great Exhibition of 1851

Industrialization and Imperialism:
The Great Exhibition of 1851
(Mosaic)

child_mine_worker.jpg
Child Mine Workers (1820's)

dore_houndsditch.jpg
Gustave Dore, Houndsditch (1872)


Nineteenth Century Ideologies (excerpted from An Intellectual History of Modern Europe by Marvin Perry pp. 203-242) 
Nineteenth Century Ideologies Study Guide; (Quiz 1) (Quiz 2) (Quiz 3)

The Political Compass: Determine your own place on the political spectrum.

"No society can surely be flourishing and happy, of which the far greater part of the members are poor and miserable." (Adam Smith)

The Zeitgeist of the Early 19th Century: Hegel: History, Dialectic and Progress; Sophie on Hegel; Hegel in Notes on Nieman's Evil in the Modern World (2002)

The Enlightenment philosophes had argued that the application of science and reason would lead to a better society for all. Did the extraordinary changes wrought by the Industrial Revolution represent progress? (Decide as a group whether your definition of progress will be grounded in a classical liberal, radical liberal or socialist political philosophy.)

Develop a provisional Class Thesis Statement, and then apply the thesis statement to your group's section of the class essay. Write a topic sentence for your group's section of the class essay.


Homework:

 

 

factory_kids.jpg
Manchester Factory Kids (1836) 

 

31Day 1Wed
eiffel_tower.jpg

pissaro_paris_small.bmp
Pissaro, "L'avenue de l'Opera, Sunlight, Winter Morning." (1898)

manet_bar.jpg

Manet, A Bar at the
Folies-Bergeres
(1881-82)


The Zeitgeist of the Early 19th Century: 

The Enlightenment philosophes had argued that the application of science and reason would lead to a better society for all. Did the extraordinary changes wrought by the Industrial Revolution represent progress? (Decide as a group whether your definition of progress will be grounded in a classical liberal, radical liberal or socialist political philosophy.)

Industrial Revolution Group Projects
Industrial Revolution Links 
Presentation Ground Rules 
Past Thesis Statements

Test Questions: (Be prepared to answer these questions from the points of view of a Conservative, a Classical Liberal, a Radical Liberal or a Socialist.)

  1. What were the causes of the Industrial Revolution in England?
  2. How did innovations in technology and business practice revolutionize the production and marketing of goods? How were these innovations financed?
  3. What impact did the new economy have on the lives (job security, work conditions, housing, health) of English workers? Did Adam Smith's "invisible hand" create a just society?
  4. How did England avoid a workers' revolution? What did workers do to exert pressure on the factory owners and the government in order that have their grievances heard? What political and legislative changes resulted from this debate?
  5. How was the ideological debate about the problem of urban poverty reflected in the popular culture of late 19th c.  England?

Homework:

Industrial Revolution Group Projects
Industrial Revolution Links 
Presentation Ground Rules

renoir_boating.jpg

Renoir, The Luncheon of the Boating Party (1881
32Day 2Thurs.FCD Visit
33Day 0Fri. Professional Day
36Day 3Mon.

manchester_1851.bmp
William Wyld's view of Manchester from Higher Broughton, 1852

daumier_carriage.bmp
Daumier, The Third-Class Carriage, (1862)

uprising.jpg
Daumier, The Uprising  (1860)

19th C. Ideologies Quiz 3

Industrial Revolution Group Projects
Industrial Revolution Links 
Presentation Ground Rules 

Past Thesis Statements

The Enlightenment philosophes had argued that the application of science and reason would lead to a better society for all. Did the extraordinary changes wrought by the Industrial Revolution represent progress? (Decide as a group whether your definition of progress will be grounded in a classical liberal, radical liberal or socialist political philosophy.)

THESIS:

  • Rough Draft: Introductory Paragraph
  • Remember that your topic sentence must be directly related to our thesis.
  • Think about transitions between your presentation and your partner's presentation.
  • Think about transitions between your group and the next group.
  • Remember to quote your texts and to cite your sources.

Homework:

dore_terraces.jpg
Dore  "The Terraces" from London  (1860)

37Day 4Tues

cid_coalbrookdale_001.jpg
Darby and Pritchard, Iron Bridge at Coalbrookdale, (1779)

crystal_palace.jpg
The Crystal Palace at The Great Exhibition of 1851


Ringling Brothers Barnum and Bailey Poster (1885)

Industrial Revolution Group Projects
Industrial Revolution Links 
Presentation Ground Rules

Past Thesis Statements

Rough Draft: Introductory Paragraph
 
Test Questions: (Be prepared to answer these questions from the points of view of a Conservative, a Classical Liberal, a Radical Liberal or a Socialist.)

  1. What were the causes of the Industrial Revolution in England?
  2. How did innovations in technology and business practice revolutionize the production and marketing of goods? How were these innovations financed?
  3. What impact did the new economy have on the lives (job security, work conditions, housing, health) of English workers? Did Adam Smith's "invisible hand" create a just society?
  4. How did England avoid a workers' revolution? What did workers do to exert pressure on the factory owners and the government in order to have their grievances heard? What political and legislative changes resulted from this debate?
  5. How was the ideological debate about the problem of urban poverty reflected in the popular culture of late 19th c. England? 

Homework:

  • Prepare for Test
38Day 5Wed.

dore_london.bmp
from Gustave Dore's London (1860)

uprising.jpg
Daumier, The Uprising  (1860)

THESIS:


Final Draft: Industrial Rev Essay 2017

Dickens Video

Test Questions: (Be prepared to answer these questions from the points of view of a Conservative, a Classical Liberal, a Radical Liberal or a Socialist.)

  1. What were the causes of the Industrial Revolution in England?
  2. How did innovations in technology and business practice revolutionize the production and marketing of goods? How were these innovations financed?
  3. What impact did the new economy have on the lives (job security, work conditions, housing, health) of English workers? Did Adam Smith's "invisible hand" create a just society?
  4. How did England avoid a workers' revolution? What did workers do to exert pressure on the factory owners and the government in order to have their grievances heard? What political and legislative changes resulted from this debate?
  5. How was the ideological debate about the problem of urban poverty reflected in the popular culture of late 19thc. England? 


Homework:

39Day 6Thurs.

Edgar Allan Poe (1809-1849)

goya_sleep_of_reason.jpg

Goya, The sleep of reason
produces monsters (1797)

Industrial Revolution Group Essay (Rough Draft)

Test Questions: (Be prepared to answer these questions from the points of view of a Conservative, a Classical Liberal, a Radical Liberal or a Socialist.)

  1. What were the causes of the Industrial Revolution in England?
  2. How did innovations in technology and business practice revolutionize the production and marketing of goods? How were these innovations financed?
  3. What impact did the new economy have on the lives (job security, work conditions, housing, health) of English workers? Did Adam Smith's "invisible hand" create a just society?
  4. How did England avoid a workers' revolution? What did workers do to exert pressure on the factory owners and the government in order to have their grievances heard? What political and legislative changes resulted from this debate?
  5. How was the ideological debate about the problem of urban poverty reflected in the popular culture of late 19thc. England? 


Edgar Allan Poe, The Black Cat (1843)
Homework:
310Day 7Fri.
311 Day 0Sat.
Spring Break
320 Day 0Mon.
Spring Break
321 Day 8Tues.

marx.jpg
 Karl Marx 1818-1883

freud.gif
Sigmund Freud 1856-1939

darwin.gif
Charles Darwin 1809-1882
nietz.jpg
Freiderich Nietzsche 1844-1900



Modern Art: The Revolt Against Representation (ppt.)

Modern Consciousness:

The Intellectual Backgrounds to Modern Consciousness:


Videos:


Homework: 

Presentation Expectations:

  • Brief Biography of your Modern Thinker
  • Answer the Study Guide Questions
  • Quote your Thinker at least Once.
  • Provide Interesting Graphics (pictures, sketches, tables) to Illustrate your Presentation.
  • Provide Excerpts from Videos to explain Difficult Concepts
  • End Your Presentation with a Properly Formatted Works Cited Page.

Homework:

  • Presentations: the Intellectual Backgrounds to Modern Consciousness



322 Day 9Wed.

marx.jpg
 Karl Marx 1818-1883

freud.gif
Sigmund Freud 1856-1939

darwin.gif
Charles Darwin 1809-1882

nietz.jpg
Freiderich Nietzsche 1844-1900

The Test of Liberalism: 
Intellectual Backgrounds: 
Marx, Freud, Darwin and Nietzsche

The Intellectual Backgrounds to Modern Consciousness:

Presentation Expectations:

  • Brief Biography of your Modern Thinker
  • Answer the Study Guide Questions
  • Quote your Thinker at least Once.
  • Provide Interesting Graphics (pictures, sketches, tables) to Illustrate your Presentation.
  • Provide Excerpts from Videos to explain Difficult Concepts
  • End Your Presentation with a Properly Formatted Works Cited Page.


Homework: Prepare for Quiz

  • Presentation on Marx
  • Presentation on Darwin
  • Presentation on Freud
  • Presentation on Nietzsche


323 Day 10Thurs.

rhodes_colossus.jpg
The Rhodes Colossus Punch vol. 103 December 10, 1892

white_man_burden.bmp
"The White Man's Burden" Detroit Journal, Feb. 1899, reprinted in Literary Digest (Feb. 18, 1899) More cartoons depicting Rhodes from NYPL.

victoria_empress_punch.jpg
"New Crowns for Old Ones" John Tenniel Punch 15 April 1876 (Victorian Web)
Quiz on Backgrounds to Modern Consciousness

The Size of Africa:
The Mercator ProjectionHow Big is Africa? (Economist)
World Map Cylyndrical Equal Area

Video:

Homework:

Social Darwinism:

For further reading:

324 Day 1Fri.
rhodes_colossus.jpg
The Rhodes Colossus Punch 1892
(Getty Images)

The British Empire (Luscombe) (clickable map)
Incredible Map Sites
Rule Britannia” (the Anthem)


The British Empire in 1897


The British Empire in 1914


Asia Colonization

The New Imperialism:

Homework:

Further reading:


africa_colonial.gif
Colonial Africa
south_east_asia_map.gif
Imperialism in South East AsiaWorld Colonial Holdings (1914)
The Colonial World 1919
327  Day 2Mon.



King Leopold II (1835-1909) of Belgium

Quiz on Backgrounds to Modern Consciousness

Modern Consciousness Presentations:

The New Imperialism:  

Homework:

For Further Reading:

328 Day 3Tues.

africablack'satlas.jpg
Africa in 1885 from Black's Atlas of the World 


The Congo

Quiz on Backgrounds to Modern Consciousness

Essay on Conrad's Heart of Darkness due Monday, April 1Oth at 3:30 p.m.

The New Imperialism:

Introduction to Conrad (Powerpoint) and Heart of Darkness 

Homework:

Heart of Darkness (Reading One, pp. 15-22; (pp. 1-6) (pp. 3-9)
Study Guide: part one

congo_chains.bmp
Prisoners at work, Belgian Congo c. 1912

329 Day 4Wed.

africablack'satlas.jpg
Africa in 1885 from Black's Atlas of the World


The Thames from London to the sea


The Thames at Gravesend

Essay on Conrad's Heart of Darkness due Monday, April 10th at 3:30 p.m

Heart of Darkness: Lesson Plan One

Marlow, the Un-named Narrator and 
Conrad's Intricate Frame for Heart of Darkness

Body Paragraph One: Conrad's Intricate Frame

Homework:


For further Reading:


Joseph Kony, Lord's Resistance Army (NPR) (NY Times);

330  Day 5Thurs.

eastafrica.jpg
West Africa


The Snake of the Congo River

leopoldville.bmp
Leopoldville: The Outer Stations

Essay on Conrad's Heart of Darkness due Monday, April 10th at 3:30 p.m.

Body Paragraph One: Conrad's Intricate Frame

Heart of Darkness: (Reading TwoLesson Plan Two (Quiz)

Body Paragraph Two: Symbols as Signposts on the Trail of Kurtz

Body Paragraph Three: The Outer Station

5th Period: Film: The Outer Station in Apocalypse Now (1979)


Homework:

331 Day 6Fri.
leopoldville.bmp
Leopoldville: The Outer Station

congo.gif
The Congo

Congo_Fishermen.jpg
Fisherman pole their boat out into the Congo River (ca. 1950). CORBIS/Otto Lang.


Late 19th Congo Sculpture (in response to the Belgian exploitation)

Essay on Conrad's Heart of Darkness due Monday, April 10th at 3:30 p.m.

Body Paragraph One: Conrad's Intricate Frame


Heart of Darkness
: (Reading TwoLesson Plan Two

Body Paragraph Two: Symbols as Signposts on the Trail of Kurtz

Body Paragraph Three: The Outer Station


Body Paragraph Four: The Middle Station


Body Paragraph Five: The Overheard Conversation (27-29)

Homework:

For further Reading:


congo_river.bmp

43 Day 7Mon.

congo.gif
The Congo 

riverboat.bmp
Congo Riverboat

Congo_Fishermen.jpg
Fisherman pole their boat out into the Congo River (ca. 1950). CORBIS/Otto Lang.

congo_headress.bmp


Essay on Conrad's Heart of Darkness due Monday, April 10th at 3:30 p.m.

Carl Jung and the Shadow: Integrating the Hidden Power of Your Dark Side (Video)


Body Paragraph One: Conrad's Intricate Frame
Heart of Darkness: (Reading TwoLesson Plan Two

Body Paragraph Two: Symbols as Signposts on the Trail of Kurtz

Body Paragraph Three: The Outer Station


Body Paragraph Four: The Middle Station


Body Paragraph Five: The Overheard Conversation (27-29)

Homework:


For further Reading:

44 Day 8Tues.

congo_river2.bmp
The Congo River

 jonestown.jpg
Jim Jones and the Guyana Tragedy: "White Night" final recording from Jonestown.
Conversation and ambient sound. 1978. (
Transcript)

Essay on Conrad's Heart of Darkness due Monday, April 10th at 3:30 p.m.

Body Paragraph Five: The Overheard Conversation (27-29)

Body Paragraph Six: The Voyage to the Inner Station
Study Guide Four

Body Paragraph Seven: Kurtz and The Inner Station  (Reading Five) Study Guide Five

 

Homework:

For further reading:

45 Day 9Wed.
congo.gif
The Congo


Congo Riverboat

congo_boy.bmp
Kamba "type," Niari River region, French Congo Jean Audema c. 1900, postcard

Essay on Conrad's Heart of Darkness due Monday, April 10th at 3:30 p.m.


Body Paragraph Six: The Voyage to the Inner Station Study Guide Four

Body Paragraph Seven: Kurtz and The Inner Station  (Reading Five) Study Guide Five

 

Homework:

Heart of Darkness: (Reading Six pp. 108-124; 61-72; 83-95) Study Guide Six

For further reading:

46 Day 10Thurs.

congo_mask.bmp
Mask (kibwabwabwa) Kete or Mbagani peoples,   Democratic Republic of the Congo, 19th-20th c.

congo_picasso.bmp
Picasso Self-Portrait (1907)

Essay on Conrad's Heart of Darkness due Monday, April 10th at 3:30 p.m.

Body Paragraph Seven: Kurtz and The Inner Station  (Reading Five) Study Guide Five


Paragraph Eight: The Return Study Guide Six

Conclusion: IS progress possible?


Homework:

47 Day 1Fri.


Late 19th Congo Sculpture (in response to the Belgian exploitation)

410 Day 2Mon.

Lynn Nottage




Central Africa


Eastern Congo: the setting for Nottage's play
Ruined (2009) by Lynn Nottage (b. 1964)
  • Contemporary American Playwright, Brooklyn born, Yale School of Drama
  • Guggenheim Genius Fellow (2005)
  • Won the Pulitzer Prize in 2009 for Ruined.
  • Her play Sweat about unemployed workers in Reading, Pennsylvania is currently running on Broadway, and just today, Lynn Nottage won the Pulitzer Prize for Best Play for 2017.
  • Brief History of the Congo Since Heart of Darkness
    • Congo Free State to Belgian Congo after Leopold's Death
    • Continued Exploitation particularly Mining of Copper and Gold
    • WWI and WWII in Africa: the Belgians fought on side of Allies against the Germans who had Colonized what is now Tanzinia, and were rewarded with control of what is now Rwanda and Burundi
    • Exploitation of Traditional Tribal Rivalries: Minority Rule of Pastoral Tribes over Majority Farmers
    • Independence Movement culminates with Election of Patrice Lumumba as first president of the Republic of Congo. He was assassinated in 1961 (with CIA assistance).
    • Joseph Desiree Mobutu, an Army officer, rules Zaire as kleptocracy with Western support. from 1965-1997.  Belgian infrastructure falls into ruins.
    • Rwandan Genocide 1994 Hutu vs. Tutsi: 800,000 dead in a week
    • Tutsi RPF leader Paul Kagame takes power and extends war into Eastern Congo in 1996 in pursuit of Hutu genocidaires. Allied with Ugandan soldiers, Kagame's troops suceeded in overthrowing Mobutu's government and installing Laurent Kabila as president.
    • Second Congo War: Kabila and his son Joseph try to eject the Rwandans from the country and the fight for control becomes a continent wide conflict 
    • The African World War lasts until 2003, but the Eastern Congo has remained a war zone ever since. 
    • The Eastern Congo possesses the richest natural resources in all of Africa. It's farmland could feed the whole continent. It's minerals, particularly coltan, a key component in modern electronic devices, are in demand throughout the world.
  • The Ituri Conflict in NW Congo during the 2nd Congo War (1999-2002)
  • The Eastern Congo (A CFR InfoGuide Presentation) from The Council For Foreign Relations
  • Jeffrey Gettleman, A Wound in the Heart of Africa NY Times 4-2-09

Homework

For Further Reading:

411 Day 3Tues.



Peter Breughel, Mad Meg (1562)




Ruined  Act One (Study Guide)

Discussion Questions: 

  • Brainstorm the supply chain, or ‘conveyor belt’, of coltan--  how does it reach the consumer and what are the consequences of mobile phone consumerism in the West?
  • Who is responsible?
    • Is it the consumer who willingly upgrades his or her mobile phone and consequently fuels the demand for more coltan?
    • Is it the mobile phone companies who all have Corporate Social Responsibility Policies, yet claim that they do not know the origin of the minerals used in their products? 
    • Or is it the rebel groups in the DRC using coltan to fund weapons? 
    • Or is it the corrupt Congolese government and its army, with its horrific human rights record?
  • Consider the women of Ruined as representative of all the people who have been ravaged by the terrible war on humanity being waged as the nations of Central Africa struggle towards modernity. Bertolt Brecht's Mother Courage and Her Children was an attempt to demonstrate that greedy, small entrepreneurs make devastating wars possible.  
    • "What they could do with round here is a good war. What else can you expect with peace running wild all over the place? You know what the trouble with peace is? No organization." 
  • Why might war be a good business opportunity? How might Mama Nadi as an entrepreneur be contributing to the war going on around her? Who, besides Mama Nadi, is making a profit because of the war?
  • Does Nottage agree with Brecht that the fundamental cause of the war is economic? Does the action of the play point to a way out of the nightmare of the past twenty years in sub-Saharan Africa? In other words, does the future belong to Mama Nadi?

Music from the Manhattan Theatre Club Production

Homework: 

  • Read Act Two of Ruined by Lynn Nottage (2008)
412 Day 4Wed.








Act Two of Ruined by Lynn Nottage (2008)

  • Act Two scene 1: (pp. 64- 65)
    • What do Sophie and Mama Nadi sing about at the opening of Act Two?
    • What happens to Josephine as she dances to the song's music?
    • What has happened to Christian over the past few weeks?
  • Act Two scene 2: (pp. 65-70)
    • Why won't Salima's husband leave?
    • Sophie says Salima should speak to him, but Mama Nadi tells Salima to forget him. How does Mama Nadi defend that choice?
    • How can Mama Nadi be so sure?
    • How did Salima's husband and her family treat her when the soldiers let her go?
    • What is the real reason why Salima blames her husband and can never forgive him?
    • With whose baby is Salima pregnant?
    • Salima's Monologue Osas Ighodoro (2011)
  • Act Two scene 3 (pp. 71-75)
    • Why won't Fortune leave?
    • What news does his friend Simon bring?
    • What does Simon say that enrages Fortune?
    • What has Fortune decided by the end of the scene?
  • Act Two scene 4 (pp. 75-87)
    • What has Christian seen Commander Osembenga's child soldiers do? Is he really the leader who will bring democracy to this part of Congo?
    • Who are Mama Nadi's women entertaining this night?
    • How will the rebels treat any group which follows Osembenga's orders?
    • How will Commander Osembenga treat any group which harbors the rebels?
    • What is Mr.Harari key interest in any conversation?
    • Who enters to see Christian doing his best Col. Kisembe imitation?
    • What happens when Osembenga assaults Sophie?
    • What does Mama Nadi force her to do?
    • How does Mama Nadi set Christian straight when he tells her all she cares about is money? (86)
  • Act Two scene 5 (pp. 87- 88)
    • What does Fortune tell Commander Osembenga? What will he do?
  • Act Two scene 6 (pp. 88- 94)
    • Why has Mr. Harari decided to get the heck out of there? Why can't he do business with the warlords and gang leaders anymore?
    • Why does Mama Nadi stay?
    • What does Mama Nadi decide to do for Sophie? Why?
    • How does Mr. Harari respond?
    • In a flash, time jumps forward a few minutes, and the worst possible scenario for Mama Nadi and the girls has come. What has Fortune done?
    • What are Osembenga and his men preparing to do?
    • How does Salima stop them? What has she done to herself? What are her last words?
  • Act Two scene 7 (pp. 94- 102)
    • How much time has elapsed between scenes?
    • Who are the 'blue helmets'? 
    • Why has Mama Nadi's business collapsed?
    • Who returns to her on this day? (How has he changed?)
    • What has he come to ask her?
    • How does Mama Nadi intitially respond?
    • What secret does she finally reveal about herself?
    • How does the play end?

Nottage's Point?

Backgrounds: 

413 Day 5Thurs.
414 Day 0Fri.
Good Friday
417 Day 0Mon.
Professional Day
418 Day 6Tues.

ww1_poster_french.bmp
Faivre, "
On les aura!" (1916)

helft_uns_fiegen.jpg (106296 bytes)
Erler, Fritz. 
"Help Us Win!" (1917)

European Humanities Artifact Project (2016-17)

Introduction to World War One Poetry

Never such innocence,
Never before or since,
As changed itself to past
Without a word—the men
Leaving the gardens tidy,
The thousands of marriages
Lasting a little while longer:
Never such innocence again.


—Philip Larkin, MCMXIV

Homework:


For further reading:
419 Day 7Wed.


European Alliances on the Eve of World War I


The German Artist Walter Trier's Map of Europe in 1914

nash.jpg (55140 bytes)
John Nash, Over the Top,
Imperial War Museum, London.

Fussell Quiz

The Grand Illusion: Poetry from Before the War

Alfred Lord Tennyson: "The Charge of the Light Brigade"
Robert Browning: "Home-Thoughts, From Abroad
Henry Newboldt: "Vitai Lampada"; "Clifton Chapel"  
Rudyard Kipling: "Danny Deever"; "Tommy"; "Recessional"; "Shillin’ a Day"; Gunga Din

Kubrick, Paths of Glory (1957): (Clip)
Renoir, Grand Illusion (complete film) (1937)

Homework:


For further reading:
The Schlieffen PlanWorld War I

420 Day 8Thurs.

french_attack_small
French Infantry Attack
War Films: The Battle of the Somme
 (Mosaic)

beckmannshell.jpg (97401 bytes)
Max Beckmann,Die Granate (Shell), 1915

Paragraph on one of the following poems:

Thomas Hardy,


Homework:  Poem Presentation Project


For further reading:

Destroy This Mad Brute—Enlist (1917) by H.R. Hopps was
an American Recruitment poster, which attacked Germany
for their brutal actions in the Rape of Belgium
421 Day 9Fri.

gaud.jpg (63503 bytes)
Henri Gaudier-Brzeska, La mitrailleuse en action
(The Machine-gun in Action), 1915, Musée National d'Art Moderne, Paris.

Flare_barbed_wire.jpg (94025 bytes)
Otto Dix, Lichtsignale (The Flare), 1917

Murdering_Airplane_small
Ernst, Murdering Airplane (1920)

singer_sargent_Gassed_small
Singer Sargent, Gassed (1918)

Poem Presentation Project

The Reality of Modern War
Prepare 2-3 minute speech on your poem.

Sainsbury's OFFICIAL Christmas 2014 Ad

Andrew Page, The legacy of gay war poets 12 November 2014

Brooke, "Peace"; "The Dead"; "The Soldier"
Asquith, "The Volunteer"
Read, "The Happy Warrior"
McCrae, "In Flanders Fields"
Seeger, "I Have a Rendezvous With Death"; 
Owen, "Anthem for Doomed Youth"; "Disabled"; "Strange Meeting"
Sassoon, "Exposure", "A Working Party"; "Counter-Attack"; "Suicide in the Trenches"
Adlington, "Bombardment"
Charles Hamilton Soreley, "When You See Millions of the Mouthless Dead"
Rosenberg, "Break of Day in the Trenches"

Homework:

Poem Presentation Project  


The Happy Warrior




424 Day 10Mon.

Singer Sargent, Death and Victory (1922)

Poem Presentation Project

The Reality of Modern War
Prepare 2-3 minute speech on your poem.

Brooke, "Peace"; "The Dead"; "The Soldier"
Asquith, "The Volunteer"
Read, "The Happy Warrior"
McCrae, "In Flanders Fields"
Seeger, "I Have a Rendezvous With Death"; 
Owen, "Anthem for Doomed Youth"; "Disabled"; "Strange Meeting"
Sassoon, "Exposure", "A Working Party"; "Counter-Attack"; "Suicide in the Trenches"
Adlington, "Bombardment"
Rosenberg, "Break of Day in the Trenches"

Homework:

For further reading:

425 Day 1Tues.


Picasso, Portrait of
Gertrude Stein
(1906)


Portrait of Ambroise Vollard,
Picasso (1910)

hokusai_great_wave.jpg (142898 bytes)
Katsushika Hokusai 
The Great Wave Off Kanagawa,
from "Thirty-six Views of Mount Fuji" (1823-29)

Hemingway’s Affirmations

The Zeitgeist of Modernism

Modernist Poetry:

Al Filreis Stein Links (UPenn) 
Al Filreis Mini-Lecture on "The Red Wheelbarrow" (UPenn) 
The Armory Show of 1913 
The Possibilities of Modernism: 1925: The Year in Review (Artchive)


Kafka Lesson Plans

Homework:

demuth_figure_5.jpg (29247 bytes)

mondrian_color_me

Demuth, The Figure 5 in Gold (1928)

Mondrian Color Me.

426 Day 2Wed.

aziovsky+ninth_wave.JPG
Aivazovsky,  The Ninth Wave, 1850



Surikov, The Morning of the Execution of the Streltsy. 1881

repin_barge_haulers.jpg
Repin, Barge Haulers on the Volga (1870)

Tchaikovsky, 1812 Overture

Nineteenth Century Russian Radicalism

Towards an Artifacts Project on the zeitgeist of mid 19th Century Russia:

Russia: 1825-1917


Homework:

For further study: 

The Russian Revolution Simulation (Spartacus)
Chronology of Russian History

427 Day 3Thurs.

bronze_horseman.jpg 
Falconet's
Statue of Peter the Great
(1788)


Nicholas I (1796-1855)

countess.jpg
The Countess in Pushkin’s "The Queen of Spades" (1834)  

perov_dostoevsky.JPG
Perov, Feodor Dostoyevsky 1872

Pushkin, "The Bronze Horseman" (1833)

Key Events:

  • Victory over Napoleon (1812)
  • The Decembrist Revolt (1815)
  • Nicholas I: Autocracy, Orthodoxy and Nationalism
  • The Failed Liberal Revolutions of 1848
  • The Crimean War (1855)
  • Alexander II Frees the Serfs (1861)
  • Assassination of Alexander II (1881)
  • Repression of Alexander III

Homework:

The Impact of 1848:

For Further Reading:

Humanities Website: Nineteenth Century Russia

Literature:

Politics:

Secondary Sources:

428 Day 4Fri.
Field Trip to National Art Museum
51 Day 5Mon.


Vladimir Ilych Lenin (1870-1924)


Red Square: Painterly Realism of a Peasant Woman in Two Dimensions
(1915) State Museum, St. Petersburg


Tatlin, Model for
Monument to the Third International (1919)
 


Poster for  October:
Ten Days That Shook the World
(1927)

The Impact of 1848:

From Socialism to Marxism to Leninism:

Backgrounds to the Russian Revolution (Powerpoint)

Review: Utopian Socialists; Marx and Engels;

Key Events Leading to the Revolution:

Victory over Napoleon (1812)
The Decembrist Revolt (1815)
Nicholas I: Autocracy, Orthodoxy and Nationalism
The Failed Liberal Revolutions of 1848
The Crimean War (1855)
Alexander II Frees the Serfs (1861)
Assassination of Alexander II (1881)
Repression of Alexander III
The Russo Japanese War (1905)
Revolution of 1905
World War One (1914-17)

The February Revolution (1917)
The Provisional Government vs. The Soviets
Lenin’s April Theses “All power to the Soviets”
The July Days "Peace, Bread, and Land"
The Kornilov Affair
The October Revolution
Suppression of Constituent Assembly
Civil War (1917-1921)

Vladimir Illych Lenin (1870-1924): “What Is to Be Done?” (1902)

 “What Was Done” (Julius lecture) (outline):

Historical Artifacts:

Literary Artifacts:


Humanities Website: The Russian Revolution

Art Website:  Russian Avant-Garde Art


Film: The Battleship Potemkin (1925) dir. Eisenstein

Cool Website: Seventeen Moments in Soviet History: 1917

For further reading:

More Lenin: "Marxism and Revisionism" (1908); Imperialism, The Highest Stage of Capitalism (1916); State and Revolution (1917) (extracts; April Theses; Call to Power,  (Perry excerpt) (1917); On the Organization of and Extraordinary Commission to Fight Counter Revolution (1917);  Origins of the CHEKA (1917); Dissolution  of the Constituent Assembly (1918)   Hanging Order for Kulaks (1918); "Artists are Irresponsible People" (1919); Conditions for Membership of Comnintern (1920)Testament (1922)

Homework: 

52 Day 6Tues.

volunteer_1917.jpg
Moor, "Have You Volunteered?" Poster. 1920

 
Tatlin’s Tower (1919)
3-D Model.

proletarian_dictatorship.jpg
Apsit, "A Year of the Proletarian Dictatorship" 1918

collective_farm.jpg
"For Shock-Brigade Reaping and for a Bolshevik Harvest." The Collective Farm Voron,  Poster. 1934

Mosaic Links: Russia Under Lenin and Stalin


Josef Stalin (1878-1953)

History of Europe - 6013 years in 3 minutes

The Revolutions of 1917

Lenin, “What Is to Be Done?” (1902)
The February Revolution (1917)
Order Number 1 (1917)
Call to Power (Oct 24, 1917)
The "Unknown" Lenin (1918)

What Was Done” (outline) (Julius lecture)

1905 Revolution
The February Revolution
The Provisional Government vs. The Soviets
Lenin’s April Theses
The July Days
The Kornilov Affair
The October Revolution

The Civil War (1918-1921)

Literature Artifacts: 

Art Artifacts:

The Soviets Under Stalin:


History Artifacts:


Literature Artifacts:

Russia During WWII:

Historical Interpretations

 

Homework:

collective_worker.jpgred_warrior.jpg
"Worker and Collective Farm Girl."The Great Fatherland War
stalin_flowers.jpg 
Vladimirski, "Roses for Stalin" (1949)
53 Day 7Wed.
schinkel.jpg
Schinkel, "Medieval City on a River" (1815)

  
hitler_at_the_Feldherrnhalle_1914.bmp
Hitler at the Feldherrnhalle,
August 1, 1914

Intellectual Backgrounds to Fascism and Communism

German Idealism:

The Rise of Modern Germany:

 

For further reading:


Homework:
54 Day 8Thurs.

schinkel.jpg
Schinkel, "Medieval City on a River" (1815)

europe_1914_small
Europe 1914

Big_Four.gif (285252 bytes)
The Big 4 met in Paris to negotiate the Treaty Lloyd George of Britain, Orlando of Italy, Clemenceau of France, and Woodrow Wilson of the U.S.

German Nationalism

  • Kant: subjective reality; radical finitude; moral freedom
  • Hegel: determined history; spirit unfolding through conflict
  • Herder: cultural pluralism
  • German Romanticism: values are subject to culture
  • Fichte: the Volk, German collective identity

The Rise of Modern Germany:

 

Homework:


55 Day 9Fri.

schinkel.jpg
Schinkel, "Medieval City on a River" (1815)

grosz_heartfield.jpg (72293 bytes) 
Grosz,  Der Monteur

 
dixjournalist.jpg (27573 bytes)

Dix, The Journalist Sylvia Von Harden (1926)
Expressionism
(Pace Powerpoint) user name: pb20s password: nov1118


Eugen Adam, The Rasing of the German Flag over Fort  Vanves before Paris January 19, 1871 (1878)

German Nationalism

  • Kant: subjective reality; radical finitude; moral freedom
  • Hegel: determined history; spirit unfolding through conflict
  • Herder: cultural pluralism
  • German Romanticism: values are subject to culture
  • Fichte: the Volk, German collective identity

The Rise of Modern Germany:

The German Experience of WWI:

The Weimar Republic (1919-1932)

·         The Collapse of Liberalism

 

Homework:

58 Day 10Mon.

nazivet2.jpg (63415 bytes)
"National Socialism
or the Sacrifice was in Vain" 1921

germany_muzzled.gif
"Muzzled"  Literary Digest 9/13/1919

fagus bauhaus.jpg (97790 bytes)
The Fagus Shoe Factory, Alfeld-an-der-Leine, Walter Gropius (1910-12)

 hitler_rally_triumph_of_the_will_small
From Riefenstahl, Leni. "Triumph of the Will." 1934

hitler_poster_last_hope_small
Schweitzer, Hans. 
"Our Last Hope: Hitler." Poster. 1932

Artifacts Essay due Monday May, 11th

 Easy Bib; Citation Machine; OSLIS Citation Maker

The German Experience of WWI:

The Weimar Republic and The Rise of Nazism (internet sources)

Secondary Sources:

Homework:



Further Reading:

hitler_poster1932.jpg (20821 bytes)

hitler_triumph_of_the_will_small

Hitler Campaign Poster 1932

From Riefenstahl, Leni. 
"Triumph of the Will." Film still. 1934

59 Day 1Tues.
Artifact Project Work
510 Day 2Wed.
Artifact Project Work
511 Day 3Thurs.
Artifact Project Work
512 Day 4Fri.
Artifact Project Work
515 Day 5Mon.
Artifact Project Work
516 Day 6Tues.


Picasso,
Guernica detail (1938)


Soviet soldiers fighting in the ruins of Stalingrad, 1942


Dali, Soft Construction with Boiled Beans (Premonition of Civil War) (1936)

Artifacts Project Due at 3:30 p.m.

Final Exam 2016: (Final Exam Schedule)

The Cosmic Salon:

The Lessons of the Modern Era

 

What have we learned from the terrible ordeals of the twentieth century? What would the following thinkers say about the prospects of liberalism surviving the 21st Century? How will liberals like you and me discover a path that can lead to a better, if not a perfect world?

 

Choose at least six writers, thinkers or characters from any of the groups to include in your conversation.

Invite your salon members to a Bunker Block at the Auschwitz prison camp to speak with Primo about his situation.  

The War in the East: Operation Barbarossa

Homework:

For further reading:

branaughconspiracy_small
Kenneth Branaugh and Stanley Tucci in Conspiracy (2001)

517 Day 7Wed.

babi_yar_eastern_front_1941_small

Operation Barbarossa Sept. 1941

Babi_yar_kiev_sept_1941_small
Kiev 1941

babi_yar_ravine_small
Kiev 1941


babi yar_small
The Ravine at Babi Yar September 29-30, 1941


Babi_Yar_prisoners_small
Women Prisoners at the Ravine of Babi Yar

Peer Review with the Laptop

Final Exam 2016: (Final Exam Schedule)

The Cosmic Salon:

The Lessons of the Modern Era


Fussell, "The Real War, 1939-1945", The Atlantic, vol. 264 No.2, (August, 1989) (Quiz)

The Fallen of World War Two (VIDEO) (Neil Halloran) (Interactive Graph)

When did the Final Solution finally metamorphose from a forced emigration program into an effort to exterminate all the Jews in Europe?

Babi Yar:

Primo Levi, Survival in Auschwitz (1947):

  • Survival in Auschwitz, pp.9-11: Preface
  • In English the original title of Levi’s memoir: “Se questo e un uomo…” is “If This Is a Man…” Can you finish the sentence for him?
  • Levi took his own life years later in 1987. He survived Auschwitz physically, but in the end it can be argued that the experience robbed him of his life.
  • Throughout the fourth quarter we have been thinking about how the Greek Ideal was challenged by the forces of industrial revolution, colonial exploitation and the rise of fascism. Ultimately, the social pressures of industrial change led to outbursts of savagery among the most advanced nations on earth.
  • How can the curious title of Levi’s memoir and his ultimate rejection of life be linked to our understanding of the ultimate fate of liberalism? (Discussion 1)

Homework:

Read Survival in Auschwitz, pp.9-38 Preface; Epigram;  1. “The Journey”; 2. “On the Bottom";  Study Guide 1
518 Day 8Thurs.

auschwitz_small

The Main Gate at Auschwitz

auschwitz2_small
Entrance to the Gas Chamber at Auschwitz

auschwitz_train.jpg
Ella Liebermann-Shiber (1927-1998)
In the Freight Wagon 1945-1949


auschwitz_selection.jpg
David Olère, Selection and
Blocks 2 to 5, Birkenau (1945)

Auschwitz_Blocks_2-5.jpg
David Olère, Selection and
Blocks 2 to 5, Birkenau
(1945)

Final Exam 2016: (Final Exam Schedule)

The Cosmic Salon:

The Lessons of the Modern Era


What have we learned from the terrible ordeals of the twentieth century? What would the following thinkers say about the prospects of liberalism surviving the 21st Century? How will liberals like you and me discover a path that can lead to a better, if not a perfect world?

Choose at least six writers, thinkers or characters from any of the groups to include in your conversation.


Invite your salon members to a Bunker Block at the Auschwitz prison camp to speak with Primo about his situation.

Discussion: The Nazi Psychological Assault:

 

Read Survival in Auschwitz, pp.9-38 Preface; Epigram;  1. “The Journey”; 2. “On the Bottom";  Study Guide 1 ; (Quiz)  (Discussion 1) (Study Guide Notes)


In English the original title of Levi’s memoir: “Se questo e un uomo…” is “If This Is a Man…” Can you finish the sentence for him?

 

Levi took his own life years later in 1987. He survived Auschwitz physically, but in the end it can be argued that the experience robbed him of his life.

 

Throughout the fourth quarter we have been thinking about how the Greek Ideal was challenged by the twin forces of industrial revolution and colonialism. Ultimately, the social pressures of industrial change led to outbursts of savagery among the most advanced nations on earth. 

 

How can the curious title of Levi’s memoir and his ultimate rejection of life be linked to our understanding of the ultimate fate of liberalism? (Discussion 1)

Homework:

Selections on the Ramp at Auschwitz

519  Day 9Fri.
primolevi_small
Primo Levi (1919-1987)

auschwitz_arrival.jpg
David Olère Arrival  1944

Final Exam 2016: (Final Exam Schedule)

The Cosmic Salon:

The Lessons of the Modern Era


Survival in Auschwitz
, pp.11-38: “The Journey”; “On the Bottom” (Quiz) (Discussion 1)
  • Paragraph: Explain the double sense of the term “extermination camp”. What aspect of the prisoner’s character is targeted by the Nazis? What is the Nazi goal?

Survival in Auschwitz, pp.38-77 3. "Initiation", 4. “Ka-Be”, 5. “Our Nights”, 6. “The Work”, 7. “A Good Day”; Study Guide ; (Quiz);  (Discussion 2)


Homework: 


522 Day 10Mon.

auschwitz_bunks.jpg
Ella Liebermann-Shiber In the Barracks (1945-1949)


auschwitz_new_prisoners.jpg
David Olère New Prisoners  1945

Final Exam 2016: (Final Exam Schedule)

The Cosmic Salon:

The Lessons of the Modern Era


Survival in Auschwitz
, pp.11-38: “The Journey”; “On the Bottom” (Quiz) (Discussion 1)
  • Paragraph: Explain the double sense of the term “extermination camp”. What aspect of the prisoner’s character is targeted by the Nazis? What is the Nazi goal?

Survival in Auschwitz, pp.38-77 3. "Initiation", 4. “Ka-Be”, 5. “Our Nights”, 6. “The Work”, 7. “A Good Day”; Study Guide ; (Quiz);  (Discussion 2)

Homework:

Survival in Auschwitz, pp.38-77 3. "Initiation", 4. “Ka-Be”, 5. “Our Nights”, 6. “The Work”, 7. “A Good Day”; Study Guide ; (Quiz);  (Discussion 2)
523 Day 1Tues.

Ella Liebermann-Shiber,
Auschwitz (1927-1998)

Final Exam 2016: (Final Exam Schedule)

Survival in Auschwitz, pp.38-77 3. "Initiation", 4. “Ka-Be”, 5. “Our Nights”, 6. “The Work”, 7. “A Good Day”; Study Guide ; (Quiz);  (Discussion 2)

Homework:

Read Survival in Auschwitz, pp.77-116 8.  This Side of Good and Evil”, 9. “The Drowned and the Saved”, 10. “Chemical Examination”,  11. “The Canto of Ulysses"

524 Day 2Wed.

David Olere (1902-1985) Prisoners Pulling a Wagon Loaded with Victims' Belongings


auschwitz_food.jpg
Ella Liebermann-Shiber (1927-1998)
Eating 1945-1949

auschwitz_soup.jpg
Ella Liebermann-Shiber (1927-1998) Soup Distribution 1945-1949

Final Exam 2016: (Final Exam Schedule)

The Cosmic Salon:

The Lessons of the Modern Era


Survival in Auschwitz, pp.77-116 Class Discussion: The Economics of Auschwitz: pp.77-116  8.  This Side of Good and Evil”, 9. “The Drowned and the Saved”, 10. “Chemical Examination”,  11. “The Canto of Ulysses" (notes) (Inferno Canto 26) (Quiz) (Discussion 3

  • Paragraph: What is the difference between the brand of capitalism driving Auschwitz’s economy and that which occurs normally in the outer world? What is necessary for survival in both worlds?


Adam Smith The Wealth of Nations (1776)

Thomas Malthus Essay on the Principle of Population (1798)


Paragraph: What happens to the moral judgment of an individual when life is reduced to its primordial situation? Can Socrates’ conception of morality survive in Auschwitz?

Homework:

Steinlauf (41)
Null Achtzen (42)
Alberto (57) (139)
The Greeks (71)
Schepshel (92)
Alfred L. (93)
Henri (98)
Elias (95)

Alex and Dr. Pannwitz (101)

 

Jean the Pikolo (112) (epiphany)

Lorenzo (119)
Ziegler (129)
Kuhn (129)
Kraus (132)
Primo (134)
The Lab Girls (141)

The Last One (149-50)

Charles (167)

525 Day 3Thurs.

auschwitz_soup.jpg
Ella Liebermann-Shiber (1927-1998) Soup Distribution 1945-1949


David Olere, Food for the Women

 
David Olere,  Auschwitz Inmates Marching

auschwitz_food.jpg
Ella Liebermann-Shiber (1927-1998)
Eating 1945-1949

Final Exam 2016: (Final Exam Schedule)

The Cosmic Salon:

The Lessons of the Modern Era

Survival in Auschwitz, pp.77-116  8.  This Side of Good and Evil”, 9. “The Drowned and the Saved”, 10. “Chemical Examination”,  11. “The Canto of Ulysses" (notes) (Inferno Canto 26) (Quiz) (Discussion 3

Survival in Auschwitz, pp. 116- 145

12. The Events of the Summer”, 13. “October 1944” (The Great Selection),  14. Kraus”, 15.  “Die drei Leute vom Labor (Quiz) (Discussion 4) (answers)


Review:
  • Paragraph: Explain the double sense of the term “extermination camp”. What aspect of the prisoner’s character is targeted by the Nazis? What is the Nazi goal?
  • Paragraph: Can the civilized self survive at Auschwitz? Or is Auschwitz revealing our true selves: man in the state of nature?
  • Paragraph: What happens to the moral judgment of an individual when life is reduced to its primordial situation? Can Socrates’ conception of morality survive in Auschwitz? How about Kant's? Apply the categorical imperative.
  • Paragraph: What is the difference between the brand of capitalism driving Auschwitz’s economy and that which occurs normally in the outer world? What is necessary for survival in both worlds?

Consider the following episodes and Primo's actions. Are they moral, or is morality irrelevant to survival? Jean the Pikolo (112); Lorenzo (119); Kuhn (129); Ziegler (129); Kraus (132)

Steinlauf (41)
Null Achtzen (42)
Alberto (57) (139)
The Greeks (71)
Schepshel (92)
Alfred L. (93)
Henri (98)
Elias (95)

Alex and Dr. Pannwitz (101)

 

Jean the Pikolo (112) (epiphany)

Lorenzo (119)
Ziegler (129)
Kuhn (129)
Kraus (132)
Primo (134)
The Lab Girls (141)

The Last One (149-50)

Charles (167)

Homework:

526 Day 4Fri.
auschwitz_rebellion.jpg
Ella Liebermann-Shiber, Revolt in Birkenau (1945-1949)

auschwitz_execution.jpg
David Olère They Tried to Escape (1946)


auschwitz_march.jpg
Ella Liebermann-Shiber, Death March (1945-1949)

Final Exam 2016: (Final Exam Schedule)

The Cosmic Salon:

The Lessons of the Modern Era

Read  Survival in Auschwitz, pp.145-175  16. “The Last One”,  17. “The Story of Ten Days

 (Quiz) (Discussion 5) (answers

Steinlauf (41)
Null Achtzen (42)
Alberto (57) (139)
The Greeks (71)
Schepshel (92)
Alfred L. (93)
Henri (98)
Elias (95)

Alex and Dr. Pannwitz (101)

 

Jean the Pikolo (112) (epiphany)

Lorenzo (119)
Ziegler (129)
Kuhn (129)
Kraus (132)
Primo (134)
The Lab Girls (141)

The Last One (149-50)

Charles (167)

Homework:

  • Write thesis statement on Survival in Auschwitz.

526 Day 4Fri.
529 Day 0Mon.
Memorial Day
530 Day 5Tues.
auschwitz_rebellion.jpg
Ella Liebermann-Shiber, Revolt in Birkenau (1945-1949)

auschwitz_execution.jpg
David Olère They Tried to Escape (1946)


auschwitz_march.jpg
Ella Liebermann-Shiber, Death March (1945-1949)

Final Exam 2016(Final Exam Schedule)

The Cosmic Salon:

The Lessons of the Modern Era


Survival in Auschwitz, pp.145-175  16. “The Last One”,  17. “The Story of Ten Days” (Quiz) (Discussion 5) (answers

Steinlauf (41)
Null Achtzen (42)
Alberto (57) (139)
The Greeks (71)
Schepshel (92)
Alfred L. (93)
Henri (98)
Elias (95)

Alex and Dr. Pannwitz (101)

 

Jean the Pikolo (112) (epiphany)

Lorenzo (119)
Ziegler (129)
Kuhn (129)
Kraus (132)
Primo (134)
The Lab Girls (141)

The Last One (149-50)

Charles (167)

Homework:

  • Write thesis statement on Survival in Auschwitz.

The Crematorium IV at Birkenau that was destroyed by the Sonderkommando in October 1944.

531 Day 6Wed.

ANDY WARHOL, Marilyn Diptych, 1962.
Oil, acrylic, and silk screen enamel on canvas.
Tate Gallery, London. 


FRANK GEHRY, Guggenheim Museum,
Bilbao, Spain, 1997.

Final Exam 2016: (Final Exam Schedule)

The Cosmic Salon:

The Lessons of the Modern Era


Post Modernist Art (ppt)

Exam Review: Grammar and Usage 
Exam Review: Vocabulary

Homework:

61 Day 7Thurs.